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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Architecture--19th century
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Record #:
21386
Author(s):
Abstract:
English architect William Percival left his mark on North Carolina during his short stay in the state between 1857 and 1860. Percival designed 13 ecclesiastical, public, and domestic structures, including the Caswell County courthouse, churches in Hillsborough, Tarboro, and Raleigh, and two dormitory classroom buildings at the University of North Carolina.
Record #:
28668
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Francis Post was the premier mid to late-nineteenth century builder-architect of Wilmington, North Carolina. He designed, built and/or supervised some of the most notable buildings in the city. Post also worked on more common, utilitarian urban buildings which tie city together as an architectural unit.
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Full Text:
Record #:
31080
Author(s):
Abstract:
K?rner’s Folly, dubbed “The Strangest House in the World,” has long amused visitors who gape at its fanciful Victorian rooms, furniture, and private theater. Built in 1880, the house was the showplace of Jule Gilmer K?rner, a talented furniture and interior designer in Kernersville, North Carolina. Starting next month, the historic home hosts a year-long set of activities to celebrate its 125th anniversary.
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Record #:
34469
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article details the history of the Thomas Devereaux Webb House including its construction, and the history of the home’s owners.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p1, il
Record #:
36134
Author(s):
Abstract:
All Saints Chapel, built in the late 1890s and constructed in the Carpenter Gothic Style, was larger than its exterior suggested. As for other aspects of its appearance, longtime residents recall the exterior as painted white, but research by the author asserted otherwise. In fact, the recent repainting has returned the church to its original color, as well as the color scheme popular during the period in which the church was built.