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12 results for Reed Gold Mine (Cabarrus County)
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Record #:
4283
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Abstract:
In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the nation occurred at John Reed's farm twenty miles east of Charlotte. As the news spread, gold seekers poured in, transforming sleepy Charlotte into a boomtown. In the 1820s, the state produced all of the native gold coined by the U.S. Mint, over a million dollars. By 1849, the gold seekers were heading for California, and the boom faded. Today the John Reed Gold Mine, a National Historic Landmark and State Historic Site, is the state's third-most visited historic site.
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Record #:
8439
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Abstract:
In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, twenty miles east of Charlotte. Reed had been a Hessian soldier who had deserted the British cause. The gold was the first native gold to be used by the U.S. Mint, and the discovery meant that America would not have to depend on European mines for gold. In 1828, a second gold strike was made in Burke County. Gold mining became the leading industry of the state after farming. For the next fifty years, until the California Gold Rush of 1849, North Carolina led the nation in gold mining.
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Record #:
9153
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The earliest documented gold found in North Carolina was a seventeen-pound nugget discovered in Cabarrus County in 1799. An eleven-year-old boy named Conrad Reed made the find, and the gold was valued at $3,600. Until 1825 when vein mining was introduced in North Carolina, most gold mining was haphazard and done by amateurs. By 1891, there were thirty-five active mines in the state, and the Reed Gold Mine in Cabarrus County is now a state historical site.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 11, Apr 1981, p8-10, il
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Record #:
16202
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Abstract:
An accidental discovery by John Reed's son in 1799 Cabarrus County started the nation's first gold rush. Gold would be discovered in the following years in thirty-four of the state's one hundred counties. For the next fifty years, until the big gold strike in California in 1849, the state led the country in the production of gold.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 10, Mar 2012, p48-50, 52, 54, 56, 58-59, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
21094
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The Reed Gold Mine in Cabarrus County was, in 1799, the site of the first authenticated discovery of Gold in the United States. North Carolina produced more gold than any other state prior to 1849, and was the source for all native gold coined by the federal mint until 1828. Details on John Reed, the owner of the Reed Gold Mine, are included.
Record #:
23141
Abstract:
In 1799, a young boy named Conrad Reed made the first documented discovery of gold in the United States. This discovery led to pan and shaft mining in the Piedmont throughout much of the nineteenth century. Reed Gold Mine State Historic Site preserves this history and allows visitors to learn about and try their hand at mining for gold.
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North Carolina Field and Family (NoCar S 1 N672), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p22-25, il, por, map
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Record #:
16075
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Conrad Reed is credited with finding the state's first trace of gold in 1799 on his father's farm in Cabarrus County. Amateur endeavors to retrieve gold persisted until 1854, when a professional miner from Mexico's silver mines and streamlined the operation. The last underground mining operation ended in 1911 and since any interest has continued with minor panning operations.
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Record #:
7958
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In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, twenty miles east of Charlotte. As the news spread, gold seekers of many nationalities poured in to seek their fortunes. The first mining that was conducted was called \"placer\" mining, or mining that is done aboveground. In 1825, Matthias Barringer discovered that gold could be found in veins of white quartz. By following the veins deep into the ground more gold could be recovered. Many of the miners left the state when gold was discovered in other Southern states and in California in 1849.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p20-21, il, map
Record #:
27996
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following the Tuscarora Indian War in 1711-1712, North Carolina realized the need for a money system. During the colonial period, hard currency continued to be scarce until recognition of the Reed Gold Mine in 1799. The state experienced a massive gold rush until the early 1800s, and since then, the exchange system has continued to evolve.
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Record #:
35639
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Abstract:
The Reed Gold Mine, located twenty miles east of Charlotte, boasted first discovering gold in the United States in 1799. Little Meadow Creek’s gold mining industry, beginning in the 1820s, revealed its lingering effects on the town at the present time. For the author, it was perceived in how visiting the Reed Gold Mine State Historic Site impacted her, her husband, and young son.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p31-34
Record #:
35727
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether interested in natural world or NC’s rich history, Wise asserted the Piedmont region catered to both. Historic sites highlighted included the Reed Gold Mine, site of the first gold discovery in the US; Chinqua-Penn Plantation, which contained art from around the globe; and Bennett Place, reconstructed Civil War site for General Johnson’s surrender to General Sherman. Nature and science lovers could be sated through Mount Morrow State Park; North Carolina Zoo, first state-owned zoo in the US; and Museum of Life and Natural Science, which contained the greatest treasure trove of outer space memorabilia.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p19, 41
Record #:
35855
Author(s):
Abstract:
Five decades before the famous Gold Rush in California, there was a discovery of this precious metal in Cabarrus County by a farmer, John Reed. Gold Fever can still be experienced in mines like the Cotton Patch in New London and Reed Mine near Concord.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p25-26