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Record #:
7076
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whatever state they are located in, junior historian organizations all share a common purpose, and that is to stress the idea that events that happen at home are just as important and history-making as those that happen elsewhere. The first junior historical society was organized in Indiana in 1938 and soon spread to other states, including Texas and New York. In North Carolina the idea was first discussed in 1946. Lewis discusses the work of historians, educators, and legislators that culminated in the passage of an act establishing the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association in 1953.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p12-15, il, por
Record #:
7075
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lewis profiles three of the founders of the Tar Heel Junior History Association: William H. Cartwright, Joye E. Jordan, and Charles Crittenden.
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Record #:
7958
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, twenty miles east of Charlotte. As the news spread, gold seekers of many nationalities poured in to seek their fortunes. The first mining that was conducted was called \"placer\" mining, or mining that is done aboveground. In 1825, Matthias Barringer discovered that gold could be found in veins of white quartz. By following the veins deep into the ground more gold could be recovered. Many of the miners left the state when gold was discovered in other Southern states and in California in 1849.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p20-21, il, map
Record #:
7073
Abstract:
The Tar Heel Junior History Association is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary in 2003. During its history the association has played a leading role in promoting the study of state and local history in the schools. The authors discuss some of the association's landmarks over the past fifty years, including the General Assembly's passing legislation ( Bill #207) establishing the association in April 1953, the start of the TAR HEEL JUNIOR HISTORIAN magazine in 1963, and the opening of a gallery in 1995 in the North Carolina Museum of History to showcase award-winning student projects.
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