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8 results for Seymour, Liz
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Record #:
13231
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During interviews with several North Carolina families that owned businesses, Seymour found that there are some very complicated but successful ways to make certain that company ownership is passed on to succeeding generations.
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Record #:
13261
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The National Association of Printers and Lithographers presented the 1980-81 Best Managed Printing Company Awards in February 1981. Of the companies from the fifty states and Canada eligible for the award, printers from North Carolina took most of the honors. Seymour discusses the printing industry in North Carolina.
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Record #:
14040
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Furniture is a major industry in North Carolina. Recently industry workers and businessmen have endured the effects of a deep recession affecting the market; however, they are now enjoying the benefits of a rebounding market.
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Record #:
14047
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Textile plants using technology virtually unknown before the 1970s are called \"Star Wars Plants\" in the industry. Plants in towns like Erwin, Wagram, and Cordova that have converted to the new high-tech equipment are not the noisy dusty plants of the past but clean, quiet ones that can out one hundred yards of cloth an hour. Seymour discusses the new technology's effect on the industry.
Record #:
14046
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Clyde Andrew founded Carolina Fabric Label Corp. in 1960 in Greensboro. At that time there were no label companies of any size in the Southeast printing labels for the textile industry. Today four companies account for 90 percent of the American market in printed cloth labels. CFL currently sells $10 million worth of printed and woven labels annually.
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Record #:
14055
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Disston, Inc. of Greensboro is a 140-year-old company with a strong reputation for making quality hand and circular saws and other hardware products. However, by the mid-1980s the company had fallen on hard times and was losing money. Seymour recounts how Hank Libby joined the company, turned it around, and made it profitable again.
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Record #:
14054
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Sales of women's hosiery create over $2 billion annually. Over half of the hosiery manufactured in the United States is made by companies headquartered in North Carolina, and two of them produce the major portion - Hanes in Winston-Salem with its L'eggs division, and Kayser-Roth, which owns No Nonsense, in Greensboro.
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Record #:
35855
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Abstract:
Five decades before the famous Gold Rush in California, there was a discovery of this precious metal in Cabarrus County by a farmer, John Reed. Gold Fever can still be experienced in mines like the Cotton Patch in New London and Reed Mine near Concord.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p25-26