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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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14 results for Faulkner, Janice Hardison
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Record #:
5949
Abstract:
Beaufort in Carteret County is the state's fourth oldest town. Faulkner discusses the town's history and architecture. A walking tour map identifying historic sites and a map of the town plan from 1713 are included.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, May/June 1975, p5-10, il
Record #:
5963
Abstract:
Halifax is the site of the first documented vote for American independence from England. It was cast by the Fourth Provincial Congress convened there on April 4, 1776. Faulkner discusses the history of the town and the buildings under restoration there.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Sept/Oct 1975, p6-9, il
Record #:
6540
Abstract:
Wilson native James Newcombe reminisces about his days in the lighthouse service. He served on lightships, which function the same way as lighthouses, except that they are anchored out at sea. Newcombe ended his career at the end of World War II at the Cape Lookout lighthouse.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p6
Record #:
6557
Abstract:
In 1965, a group called the Historic Hope Foundation set out to save an abandoned house in Bertie County called Hope. The house had been built by David Stone, who was very active in state politics. He had been a member of the General Assembly, superior court judge, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, a U.S. Senator, and in 1808, governor of North Carolina. Within a year enough money had been raised to buy the house and eighteen acres of land. Restoration of the property began immediately. By 1972, Hope Plantation had been entered on the Register of Historic Places and opened to the public.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p36-38, il
Record #:
35686
Abstract:
Hain’ts, not horror films, was thrilling entertainment in Coastal counties such as Sampson and during the author’s youth. As she proved in her illuminations of things that go bump in the dark, though, ghosts chasing and the stories they inspire are really timeless and universal pastimes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p24-25
Record #:
35772
Abstract:
The former ECU English faculty member educated readers on the origins of pig picking, a dining tradition she declared was a socio-economic equalizer. As Faulkner disclosed, North Carolina can almost claim authorship of this tradition. Authorship can be claimed as far as the tradition starting in the South. The dividing line—the Mason-Dixon line, that is—can be found far north of it, with this Southern tradition having caught on in at least one town in Pennsylvania.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p47-48
Record #:
35800
Abstract:
Faulkner revealed sources for the team names of several well-known colleges across the US. Included were state bird (University of Delaware Blue Hens), a Civil War regimen (Kansas State Jayhawkers), a type of tree (Ohio State Buckeyes), and Native American tribes (Miami University Redskins). The one she discussed the most, though, was the Carolina Tar Heels, offering three explanations for a team name that has also become a nickname for North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p48
Record #:
35812
Abstract:
Many articles are written about NC’s series of lighthouses, but keepers often not mentioned. In this instance, the spotlight was placed on the person who kept the beacon burning. Highlighted were details of lighthouse keeper life and later work experience aboard a lightship. Also mentioned were the seven lighthouses where he worked, such as Cape Charles on Smith Island and Cape Lookout off of Harkers Island.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p6
Record #:
35869
Abstract:
Faulkner shared her version of childhood summer vacations from school, a rural Martin County experience markedly different from how many children today experience that three month break. From her reflection, she asserted that the children of yesteryear knew vacations as they were meant to be.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p10
Record #:
35848
Abstract:
Was quilting’s comeback because, as Faulker speculated, of the current energy crisis or colder winters? Whatever the cause, the author was appreciative for the revival of interest that had also resurged warm memories.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p8
Subject(s):
Record #:
35836
Abstract:
Faulkner noted cave walls as a site of a form of communication not regarded so often as such: graffiti. As for a modern day equivalent of cave walls, Faulkner noted school desktops as a site for what may also be seen as a combination of written communication and artistic expression.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p8
Record #:
35852
Abstract:
Creativity can be defined in at least two ways, one related to artistic expression, the other devising a new use for an existing item. Faulkner’s discovery of how paper-based have evolved in terms of purpose includes how fans became used in a courting ritual taking place at church.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p10
Record #:
35906
Abstract:
In commemoration of the State Fair, the author offered a reminiscing of this event, county style. Example highlighted was Pitt County’s version. Features such as a village exhibit and individuals like Connor Eagles making the Fairgrounds a highly recommended pit stop.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p10
Record #:
29208
Abstract:
The governorship of North Carolina, the highest governmental office, is also the oldest. This article discusses the history of the state’s political system and the upcoming 1980 gubernatorial election.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p28-30, por