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7 results for Halifax--History
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Record #:
3806
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Abstract:
Halifax, founded in 1760 in Halifax County, was a force in the state's politics, economy, and culture between 1760 and 1820. When the new railroads bypassed the town, its influence diminished. Today, a quiet, 40-acre, non-commercial site with seven restored buildings attracts tourists.
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Record #:
5963
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Halifax is the site of the first documented vote for American independence from England. It was cast by the Fourth Provincial Congress convened there on April 4, 1776. Faulkner discusses the history of the town and the buildings under restoration there.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Sept/Oct 1975, p6-9, il
Record #:
8220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joseph Montfort was a prominent man in colonial North Carolina. He was a clerk of the Halifax County Court, a member of the North Carolina colonial Assembly, a colonel in the militia, and a treasurer of the northern counties of the colony. In 1771 he was named Provincial Grand Master of America by the English Masonic order, the highest office an American has held in the Masonic organization. Montfort built his home in the town of Halifax on lot 52. This fashionable home existed till 1872, when it burnt down. The site was then covered with dirt and used for cotton farming. In 1972, the lot was found again using C. J. Sauthier's 1769 map. Archaeological excavations on the site began in 1978 and continued in 1979. The original foundation was uncovered, along with 1,600 other artifacts. Today a museum sits over the archaeological site. Visitors can view the foundation and other artifacts as well as tour the thirty-two-acre historic Halifax district.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p22-24, por
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Record #:
8463
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Since 1976, the Town of Halifax has performed the play \"First for Freedom.\" The summer production includes both fact and fiction in telling the story of Halifax's role during the Revolutionary War. The Halifax Resolves, signed a few months before the United States Declaration of Independence, was the first official declaration of independence from Great Britain. The play, written by Maxville Burt Williams, includes scenes from historic Halifax as well as scenes from the Fourth Provincial Congress that met at the Halifax courthouse on April 12, 1776.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p27-28, por
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Record #:
24856
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Charles and Karen Vaughan took a home owned by Charles’ great-great grandfather and restored it to its former glory. There were a few renovations not specific to the original house such as the added kitchen space, converting the barn into a guesthouse, and the chicken coop into an outdoor living space. The furnishings are from a variety of periods, and the house was entered on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.
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Record #:
31618
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The Halifax Resolves were adopted by North Carolina’s Fourth Provincial Congress in session at Halifax on April 12, 1776. Three months later in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress incorporated many of its ideas into the new nation’s Declaration of Independence. The birthplace of the first official State action for independence, Halifax continues to preserve much of its 18th century history.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Apr 1976, p14-15, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34391
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Abstract:
This year, the annual celebration of the anniversary of the Halifax Resolves will be a three-day event. The April 12, 1776 resolution, ratified by North Carolina’s Fourth Provincial Congress was a major step toward independence from British rule. The resolves were the first official call for independence by the elected leaders of an entire colony.