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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Barbecue
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Record #:
423
Author(s):
Abstract:
The subtle aesthetics of North Carolina BBQ differ in the eastern and western regions of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 1, June 1992, p17-20, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9335
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Early, of Winston-Salem, the author of THE BEST TAR HEEL BARBEQUE: MANTEO TO MURPHY, has selected twenty-five barbecue establishments to make up the North Carolina Barbecue Society's Historic Barbecue Trail. To qualify, each restaurant had to be in business a minimum of fifteen years; make its own sauce; offer sit-down dining; and cook real North Carolina-style pork barbecue on site. That means the pig must be cooked in a pit over wood or charcoal.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 4, Apr 2007, p58-59, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
12116
Abstract:
Peterson Associates is a Charlotte architectural firm that specializes in hospital design. The firm's designs feature skylights, many windows, energy efficient control systems, and interiors that are light, spacious and cheerful - \"all with a focus of saving energy and lowering hospital design costs.\"
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 40 Issue 11, Nov 1982, p84, 86, 128, il
Record #:
13940
Author(s):
Abstract:
Samuel Dillard opened his grocery store and restaurant in Durham in 1953. It closed on March 18, 2011 due to the uncertain economy in the state and country. Wallace reflects on the restaurant's fifty years. Dillard's barbecue featured a mustard-based sauce, which was different from the eastern vinegar and the western tomato.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 13, Mar 2011, p31 Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
19825
Abstract:
Texas native Gwen Ashley Walters held the notion that many Texans hold, that Texas barbecue is the only true barbeque and that other regional specialties were imitations at best. This changed when her husband, a former North Carolinian, took her to Stamey's Barbecue in Greensboro. Her experience with North Carolina style barbecue opened her to new possibilities and the existence of delicious barbeque outside of Texas.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
22235
Abstract:
Michael Markham has a unique approach to dispensing barbecue in the Research Triangle Area. He tows a red barn, 18'x6,' behind his pickup truck. Inside are a smoker and all the fixings for a barbecue plate with collards and baked beans or a barbecue sandwich. Raleigh tends to discourage food trucks; there are a lot of hoops to jump through. It took Mike months to get the barn up to code, but he did it and now he has been selling his product for almost three years. Mike can be found parked outside office buildings, festivals, and places where there are other food trucks.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p47--48, 50, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
24450
Author(s):
Abstract:
Newport in Carteret County is known for its friendliness, community pride, and barbecue. This article discusses the history of the Newport Pig Cooking Contest and how it has transformed and helped the town over the years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 11, April 1991, p34-36, il
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Record #:
28510
Author(s):
Abstract:
B.W. Keaton got people’s attention when he started serving barbecue-sauced fried chicken at his restaurant in Rowan County, North Carolina. While Keaton’s Barbecue has certain rules for its customers, his fried chicken is legendary.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 11, April 2017, p102-110, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
29625
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Jones family serve barbecue at Skylight Inn BBQ in Ayden and Sam Jones BBQ in Winterville, North Carolina. While taking their barbecue across the country and forming network connections, the Jones came across television opportunities. This September, they will be filmed on the Travel Channel.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2017, p20-21, il, por
Record #:
35772
Abstract:
The former ECU English faculty member educated readers on the origins of pig picking, a dining tradition she declared was a socio-economic equalizer. As Faulkner disclosed, North Carolina can almost claim authorship of this tradition. Authorship can be claimed as far as the tradition starting in the South. The dividing line—the Mason-Dixon line, that is—can be found far north of it, with this Southern tradition having caught on in at least one town in Pennsylvania.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p47-48