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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Wallace, Daniel
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22789
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Saxapahaw has been a town in transition since the closure of the local textile mills. As old buildings are torn down to make way for apartments, condos, and businesses, the Saxapahaw General Store maintains old town charm while offering products for every customer.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 8, January 2015, p45-48, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23104
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Tracker and guide, Dwight McCarter finds those who disappear from their families and friends while hiking in the Smoky Mountains. Although he mostly works in Tennessee, many times his tracking trips take him to North Carolina as well. His knowledge of the region and his storytelling skills are impressive, making this article a captivating read.
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23101
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In 2006, chef Vivian Howard and her husband Ben Knight opened their restaurant Chef and the Farmer near Kinston, North Carolina. After spending years in New York City, the couple returned to Vivian's hometown and have now built a unique farmhouse in Deep Run.
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Record #:
24610
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Lexington calls itself the “Barbecue Capital of North Carolina,” due to the number of barbecue restaurants in town, the annual barbecue festival, and the Bar B-Q Center restaurant. The Bar-B-Q Center, which opened in 1955, is one of the best-known barbecue joints in the country.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p49-50, 52-53, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
29566
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North Carolina sculptor Patrick Dougherty, also known as the Stickman, creates whimsical sculptures comprised of tree saplings, branches, twigs and vines. Over the past thirty years, he has built hundreds of these works in public, and become internationally acclaimed. His latest work will be constructed at Durham’s Sarah P. Duke Gardens.
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21792
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Latham \"Bum\" Dennis founded Bum's, the well-known Ayden barbecue restaurant, in 1963, and it's been a mainstay ever since. Bum and his son Larry make wood-smoked eastern-style barbecue, and for barbecue lovers that is all the advertising they need to come to this unpretentious restaurant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p57-58, 60, 62, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22098
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Barbecue in NC divides between Eastern and Western style. Although Bib's Downtown does barbecue, it's neither of the two traditional ones. It's a potpourri of pulled pork, brisket, chicken, and other meats all flavored with owner Mark Little's own sauce--Bestern BBQ Sauce. Little opened his place in 2008 in the shell of an old Firestone auto shop of West 5th Street in Winston-Salem.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p57-58, 60-61, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22139
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Sylvester Hursey began his barbecue in Burlington back in the mid-40s in his backyard. Son Charles, now near 70, began working at the establishment when he graduated from high school in 1960. Wallace recounts how Hursey's, from its humble start, has grown to three locations in the Burlington area and received the first license in North Carolina to sell barbecue wholesale.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p53-54, 56-57, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22235
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Michael Markham has a unique approach to dispensing barbecue in the Research Triangle Area. He tows a red barn, 18'x6,' behind his pickup truck. Inside are a smoker and all the fixings for a barbecue plate with collards and baked beans or a barbecue sandwich. Raleigh tends to discourage food trucks; there are a lot of hoops to jump through. It took Mike months to get the barn up to code, but he did it and now he has been selling his product for almost three years. Mike can be found parked outside office buildings, festivals, and places where there are other food trucks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p47--48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22226
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Tasha and William Kornegay of Apex never thought making cotton candy was the career path they were on. She works in mental health, and he is in marking; they met fifteen years ago while working in a school system. In 2013, Tasha was trying to raise funds for HIV research. She rented a cotton candy machine and took it to the Peak City Pig Fest. It was a hit. The Kornegays are vegan and their product is certified organic, kosher, gluten-free, with no artificial food coloring.
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Record #:
22445
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Richard Monroe opened his barbecue restaurant on Main Street in Salisbury in 1979, and his establishment has been a popular local fixture ever since.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 1, Jun 2014, p53--57, il, por Periodical Website
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