NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


14 results for General stores
Currently viewing results 1 - 14
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4413
Author(s):
Abstract:
Those living in the country in 1900 depended on the country store for all their home and farm needs, even the mail. Two events at the start of the 20th-century lessened this dependency. The automobile meant people could drive to town, where there were more stores. The start of Rural Free Delivery (RFD) routes brought mail to the home, eliminating the need to pick it up at the country store.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
7686
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scattered across the state are hundreds of general stores. Many functioned as the hubs of their communities for generations. This pictorial essay presents a number of them, including their founding dates, locations, owners' names, and items sold.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8993
Author(s):
Abstract:
Opened in 1865, The T.L. Norris Grocery store in South Mills has changed hands many time over the years. Today the store sells mostly hardware and is owned and operated by T. Lloyd Norris. Very much a tourist attraction, the store also sells old family bibles, clothing, and real slate pencils.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Aug 1980, p24-25, 40, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9176
Abstract:
Patterson's Mill Country Store, located between Durham and Chapel Hill, combines a country store with a museum. Following authentic 19th century store plans, owners Elsie and John Booker built their store using boards from old warehouses and stores, and opened Patterson's Mill in 1973. The Bookers travel all over the country for their treasures, and devote one room to North Carolina handicrafts. Although still not very well-known, the Bookers' store is starting to gain attention nationally as well as internationally.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 9, Feb 1977, p18-19, 36, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
10701
Abstract:
At one time general stores functioned as a community's hub. Townspeople gathered there to buy supplies and talk about anything in the town. These store have mostly disappeared from the landscape, being replaced by mass marketing and big-box retailers. Milling describes some that carry on the old general store tradition. They are Buchanan's Store Manson), Fred's General Mercantile (Beech Mountain), Ronnie's Country Store (Winston-Salem), N.C. Clampitt Hardware (Bryson City), Z.A.K.'S of Mallardtown USA (Trenton), and the Senior's Country Store (Welcome).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 8, Jan 2009, p42-44, 46-48, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
22789
Author(s):
Abstract:
Saxapahaw has been a town in transition since the closure of the local textile mills. As old buildings are torn down to make way for apartments, condos, and businesses, the Saxapahaw General Store maintains old town charm while offering products for every customer.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 8, January 2015, p45-48, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
28491
Abstract:
Once a stagecoach stop, Washburn’s General Store in Rutherford County is where the locals eat lunch and orders come in from around the world. The history of the general store and its owners are detailed. The store has been in the family for five generations and remains a pillar of the local community.
Source:
Record #:
31596
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this article, Richard Elmore of Charlotte describes his grandfather’s country general store. The store sold mainly groceries and staples, but customers also brought in fur pelts, crafts, and other goods for trade or purchase. Elmore describes daily operations in the store and the types of people that visited the store.
Source:
Record #:
34275
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lola Ward, owner of the oldest grocery store in North Carolina, was known for spreading news in Saluda. Thompson’s Store, named after Lola’s father, George, started in 1890. The store became known as “information central” because it was the place where locals went for word on everything from the arrival of newborn babies to the railroad schedule.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
34279
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sutton’s Drug Store has been a Chapel Hill staple for decades, serving as a family restaurant, and “old-time” drug store. In this article, the author describes fond memories of the cash register and traditions at Sutton’s.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p54-58, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
34283
Abstract:
This section of Our State highlights the best places in North Carolina to find specialty items for a country meal. Places covered include meat from Smith’s Red & White in Rocky Mount, eggs from Massey Creek Farms in Madison, bread from Shiloh General Store in Hamptonville, milk from Mills River Creamery in Mills River, pimento cheese from Musten & Crutchfield in Kernersville, beer from Bestway Grocery in Greensboro, and chicken salad from Robert’s Grocery in Wrightsville Beach.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p124-144, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ronnie Horton has owned Ronnie’s Country Store in Winston-Salem since 1994, when he purchased it from members of the W.G. White family. The store is known for its country ham and also features Old North State delicacies and local produce. This article describes the store and Horton’s traditional operations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p146-152, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
34754
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community stores were a tradition in 20th century Carteret County. Carrying everything from food stuffs to household items, every store kept personalized accounts for each family. The author recalls each of the nine stores selling specialty items—one is remembered as carrying fresh farm produce, for example, while another sold handmade Moon Pies. Kib’s Store, in particular, was memorable due to it’s shotgun architectural style and distinctive lean.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p12-13, il
Record #:
35622
Author(s):
Abstract:
Owen’s return to his hometown revealed little had changed during his years away in college working on a Bachelor’s degree and present work with a Master’s. One illustration was daily activity at the local general store. As he discovered, it was still a site for yarns, but not of the sewing circle sort: it was the creative license a narrator used to stitch together a tale.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p33-36