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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Native Americans
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Record #:
13694
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three races of Native Americans populate Robeson County; they are the Doegs, Melange, and Malungeons. The author suggests that this can be attributed to inter-racial procreation between Native Americans and the lost colonists from Roanoke.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p9-11, il
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Record #:
15153
Author(s):
Abstract:
Native American tribes in North Carolina are divided into three regions; Eastern, Piedmont, and Mountains. Eastern tribes included Hatteras, Nottoways, Meherrins, Pasquotanks, Chowtanocs, Mahapunga, Pamlicos, and Tuscaroras. Catawba, Saponi, Keyauwee, and Ocaneechi tribes comprised the Piedmont area. Cherokee dominated the western part of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 28, Dec 1941, p4, 25, por
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Record #:
16213
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the Great Depression era, school children experienced public education very differently depending on their race. African American students attended more one-room schools and received less funding than white counterparts. Native American students often were refused at public schools, sent off to missionary schools in which English was the only allowed language.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
29075
Author(s):
Abstract:
An archeological survey in Central Florida is described. The purpose of the survey was to find and recognize Seminole archaeological material. The survey around the areas of Gainesville and at spots along the St. Johns River is described. The surveyors were specifically looking for remains of Seminole pottery. The team did not have any luck around Gainesville but found several significant sites along the St. Johns River.
Record #:
35294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Used in ceremonial or spiritual contexts, Yaupon was the main ingredient in what was known as the “black drought,” or black drink, in Native American societies.
Record #:
35288
Author(s):
Abstract:
Written by the author in 1878, the reasoning for crimson colored flowers and the roan color of the mountain is attributed to a Native American legend.
Record #:
35800
Abstract:
Faulkner revealed sources for the team names of several well-known colleges across the US. Included were state bird (University of Delaware Blue Hens), a Civil War regimen (Kansas State Jayhawkers), a type of tree (Ohio State Buckeyes), and Native American tribes (Miami University Redskins). The one she discussed the most, though, was the Carolina Tar Heels, offering three explanations for a team name that has also become a nickname for North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p48
Record #:
36518
Abstract:
A traveling exhibit set up by the British Museum brought 75 watercolor drawings by John White to the NC Museum of History in Raleigh. These drawings depicted flora, fauna, Native Americans, and the area around present-day Roanoke Island. Dr. Kim Sloan wrote a catalog that accompanied the exhibit and included essays by authors with additional perspectives.
Record #:
36161
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parts of the wild turkey not consumed were used in ingenious ways, Native American groups had proven for hundreds of years. The anatomical parts that could be decorative or utilitarian included the wild turkey’s bones, spurs, feathers, and beards.
Record #:
36351
Abstract:
Sculptor Peter Toth gifted each of the 50 states and Canada Native American wooden statues in memorial of the Trail of Tears. Although not Native American, Toth felt compelled to honor the plight of the Cherokee and also used the statues as a way to remember his own family’s journey to America.
Record #:
39468
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hawkeye Indian Cultural Center has provided services vital to preserving, celebrating, and illuminating cultural traditions of the Native Americans of the sandhills in and around Hoke County since 1997. Their mission is to strengthen families, unite people through cultural enrichment, and enhance the self-sufficiency of underserved and distressed communities.