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Record #:
11311
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina possesses one of the last remaining wilderness areas along the Atlantic Coast. It's called Smith Island, more popularly known as Bald Head. Locals are debating its future. Conservationists hope to create a maritime preserve, while Frank Sherrill envisions a huge resort and residential community. Sherrill, the owner of the island, plans to build the resort and create a town on the island complete with the proper infrastructure. This sub-tropical island attracts fisherman and nature watchers yearly since it remained uninhabited prior to the 1960s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 19, Mar 1966, p8-9, il, map
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Record #:
6832
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina possesses one of the last remaining wilderness areas along the Atlantic Coast. It's called Smith Island, more popularly known as Bald Head. The island is home to a number of wildlife species and contains numerous salt marsh areas which produce food for resident fish and sea mammals. Cooper writes, “It is the last vestige in North Carolina of a primitive coast line. Unfortunately, plans are being made for its development, and, if steps are not taken to preserve its natural features, this last North Carolina coastal wilderness will disappear, transformed into a jungle of concrete, beach houses, and hotels.”
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Record #:
8381
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smith Island, more popularly known as Bald Head, is the state's most isolated coastal area and one of the last remaining wilderness areas along the Atlantic Coast. A familiar island landmark is the Coast Guard Lighthouse, built in 1817. The island is home to a number of wildlife species and contains numerous salt marsh areas. Visitors to the island are occasional, and the place can be reached only by boat. How long the island will remain untouched before it disappears under a conglomeration of concrete, beach houses, and hotels is unknown.
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Record #:
35812
Abstract:
Many articles are written about NC’s series of lighthouses, but keepers often not mentioned. In this instance, the spotlight was placed on the person who kept the beacon burning. Highlighted were details of lighthouse keeper life and later work experience aboard a lightship. Also mentioned were the seven lighthouses where he worked, such as Cape Charles on Smith Island and Cape Lookout off of Harkers Island.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p6