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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Soil--North Carolina
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Record #:
23983
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Abstract:
The author presents various microorganisms found in soil that help nurture plants and how to keep soil full of microorganisms all year round.
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Record #:
31583
Author(s):
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The big granite quarry of Dickerson, Inc., in Richmond County is the eastern-most granite quarry in North Carolina. The 77-acre quarry is surrounded by a conservation plan aimed at environmental quality. Soil conservationists planted grass and vegetation areas to prevent erosion and protect the surrounding natural areas.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 12, Dec 1978, p19, il
Record #:
32054
Author(s):
Abstract:
Families can lose substantial amounts of money and suffer many inconveniences because they are selecting poor homesites. In this article, soil scientists from North Carolina State University discuss the diversity of soil types found in the state and characteristics of suitable sites for land development.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 6, June 1971, p17, il
Record #:
34816
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State of North Carolina has three broad provinces with different soil characteristics—Blue Ridge, Piedmont, and the Coastal Plain. The Blue Ridge area is predominantly metamorphic rock while the Piedmont and Coastal Plain have a clay and sand mixture. Of these two materials, clay is the most difficult to work with. Despite its ability to hold water, clay’s clingy nature can be damaging to plants. The author recommends adding gypsum or compost to clay and silty soils.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 28 Issue 2, March 2016, p17-20, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
35431
Author(s):
Abstract:
Highlighted in Tammy Stern’s article that proves soil’s importance is the abundance of creatures that call it home (one quarter of the earth’s animal inhabitants) and the types of soil that support plant life. In fact, the importance of soil was recognized in the traveling exhibition, “Get Soiled: Visit Dig It”! that opened at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science in May 2015.
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Record #:
36560
Author(s):
Abstract:
Offering better healthcare outcomes is often a byproduct of diet, accounting for the food source itself and its source. Meats touted as nutritious and delicious include bison and elk. Benefits of these meats noted by King are lower cholesterol content and higher levels of protein and iron. As for environmental factors that impact produce and meat quality, the author recommended preserving topsoil and balancing the soil ecosystem. Such actions can yield healthy carbon levels and grasses for animals that positively impact their nutrient output.