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21 results for Organic farming
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Record #:
2899
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Niche crops, or products raised for a specialized market, allow farmers to diversify their production. Niche crops include organic fruits and vegetables, and horticultural crops, including herbs, cut flowers, and native ornamentals.
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Record #:
4043
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Organic farming, or farming without chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, began in the state in the late 1970s. The market has expanded from vegetables to include fruits, grains, cut flowers, and medicinal and cooking herbs. Currently there are over fifty certified organic farmers in the state. Most farms are around three acres, but the acreage is increasing.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 38 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p32-33, il
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Record #:
7999
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Organic farming, or farming without chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, is a growing trend in North Carolina. With the decline of the tobacco economy, there is a movement toward producing a wide range of foods locally and organically. The Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock held its first Organic Growers School in 1994. Over the next few years one or two hundred people attended the one-day event. In 2006, the event drew 1,100 people from North Carolina and fourteen other states. The school featured fifty-six class sessions in fourteen tracks from soil science to marketing, nine half-day workshops, a full-day children's program, and three vendor talks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p116-118, 120-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10188
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The state's Specialty Crops Program, which started in 1997, fosters specialty crop production. These niche crops, or products raised for a specialized market, such as truffles, allow farmers to diversify their production.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 6, June 2008, p28-30, il
Record #:
16947
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With a growing global economic environment and a shift toward healthier alternatives, North Carolina farmers are looking to organic farming as alternatives to traditional crops.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p67-73
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Record #:
27007
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Many of the latest food fads are scams, but others, such as the fish fad, are riddled with pesticides and pollutants. North Carolinians are more prone to food contaminants due to the state’s farming activity, humid climate, and proximity to the coast. Citizens are advised to take food precautions, and to consider new laws that would encourage organic farming and tax pesticide use.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Jan 26-Feb 28 1989, p10-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
28135
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Demand is high in the Triangle area for locally raised organic meat and eggs and organic locally produced breads, but there is a lack of organic grain in the state. This lack of organic grain has prenvented small producers from serving the organic foods market. North Carolina State University is attempting to turn this trend around by using two recent grants to promote organic grain production. Local farmers talk about the lack of organic grain in the state and how the NC State program is helping them change that problem.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 19, May 2008, p37 Periodical Website
Record #:
28813
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Despite Durham’s urban sprawl and industry, the Jenkins family collard farm lives on. Greg Jenkins explains how the family tradition of using organic farming practices is what has kept the farm and family business so successful.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 47, Dec 2016, p22, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29729
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The nonprofit organization Organic Growers School started from the volunteer efforts of farmers and extension specialists who gathered in 1993 to address the need for region-specific cultivation support for farmers in Western North Carolina. Their twenty-fourth annual Spring Conference will bring people to Asheville for a weekend of classes and workshops on a range of topics related to gardening, farming, permaculture, and sustainable living.
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Record #:
29800
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More people are beginning to understand the importance of local, organic food, but few know how to confront the large corporate retail chains that control what is on grocery store shelves. Local Organic Y’All is a North Carolina-based independent food advocacy group that aims to increase access to locally grown, organic food by engaging with mainstream supermarkets and wholesalers in the state.
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Record #:
31530
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Mother Earth News is a widely read magazine on natural living, organic gardening, solar energy and other sustainable practices. The organization’s managers are developing an “Eco Village” for its headquarters in Hendersonville. The village will feature two solar greenhouses, a farm, camping sites, picnic areas, and nature trails.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 8, Aug 1980, p10, il, por
Record #:
36446
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When it comes to Belks’ contemporary company image, the word fashionable can be replaced with sustainable. Planting seeds of accountability toward the earth and environment is this corporation’s ecologically rooted endeavors. Endeavors exemplified were a volunteer farm stand, Common Grounds, and organic farm, Wild Hope Farm.
Record #:
36572
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A nonprofit started by Ali Casparian in 2012 sought to do more than offer provisions for those experiencing food insecurity; she sought to help individuals have a healthier, sustainable way of life. Through the support of organizations such as MANNA Foodbank, Swannanoa Community Garden, and New Sprout Organic Farms, the dream has become a reality that has gone beyond her vision. The reality turned into three weekly market locations, a daycare center, senior housing center, provided for senior citizens and low-income families in Buncombe County.
Record #:
36560
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Offering better healthcare outcomes is often a byproduct of diet, accounting for the food source itself and its source. Meats touted as nutritious and delicious include bison and elk. Benefits of these meats noted by King are lower cholesterol content and higher levels of protein and iron. As for environmental factors that impact produce and meat quality, the author recommended preserving topsoil and balancing the soil ecosystem. Such actions can yield healthy carbon levels and grasses for animals that positively impact their nutrient output.
Record #:
36559
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Despite being labeled as organic and regarded as more profitable by large poultry producers, the author asserts slower growing chickens is the better breed. Benefits for standard bred heritage chickens: stronger skeletal structure, normal organ development, greater muscle mass and meat texture, and stronger immune systems. Benefits for farmers and consumers are genetic sustainability and better taste, respectively.