NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Animal husbandry
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
36586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Touted as an advantage for homeschooling was developing a connection with nature by learning skills such as growing produce and animal husbandry. Reasons noted for homeschooling included children possessing gifts or challenges traditional schooling is unequipped to handle. While adhering to the state’s core curriculum and assessments, it utilizes teaching methods aligning with learning styles and interests and prioritize mastery over grades. Local support for homeschooled children includes Asheville Arboretum’s EXPLORE and Earthaven Ecovillage.
Record #:
36563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditionally, lands unfenced meant lands were free for anyone, owners and not, to use for hunting, fishing, and grazing. The Civil War, with its attendant population growth and rise of commercial farming, helped to bring about fencing laws and end to open range. Pictured was the type of fence that dotted the Appalachian landscape by the 1890s.
Record #:
36559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite being labeled as organic and regarded as more profitable by large poultry producers, the author asserts slower growing chickens is the better breed. Benefits for standard bred heritage chickens: stronger skeletal structure, normal organ development, greater muscle mass and meat texture, and stronger immune systems. Benefits for farmers and consumers are genetic sustainability and better taste, respectively.
Record #:
38204
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Charlotte couple traded an urban life for rural life in buying a farm, with the expected part of their pastoral plan involving animals like llamas and horses. The unexpected member of their animal menagerie was alpacas. This in turn yielded an unexpected result for their dream home: it became Good Karma Ranch. What the couple calls an “adult camp” currently specializes in agritourism, products made from alpaca fur, and BYOB gatherings. The expanded version of “adult camp” at Good Karma Ranch will soon include yoga and wine and paint nights.