NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Home schooling
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
3357
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dissatisfied with the type of education their children are receiving in the public schools, a number of parents are choosing home schooling as an alternative. For the 1994-95 school year, around 7,300 home schools have registered with the state.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 33, Aug 1995, p11-13, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
4382
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1995-96, the number of home-schooled children in North Carolina exceeded 13,000. Eventually a point is reached where parents of these children cannot instruct in advanced courses, such as chemistry and physics, and request local school systems to allow their children to attend part-time. Schools are not required to do this, either by state or federal law. North Carolina law does not prohibit this, allowing schools systems to decide requests on an individual basis.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Summer 1997, p16-22, il
Record #:
5714
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the 1994-95 school year, over 11,000 children were home schooled in the state. This method cannot offer all classes. Requests to public schools for special classes like chemistry challenge the schools in fitting these students in.
Record #:
28465
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dismayed by the public schools, many parents are finding an alternative in home schooling. Statewide, the number of children homeschooled in North Carolina has tripled over the last four years. Home-schooling parents say their children are excelling in an atmosphere where they work at their own pace, receive individualized attention, and are free from the distractions and bad influences of public schools. The pros and cons of homeschooling are discussed, along with stories from Triangle area parents who are homeschooling their children.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 33, August 1995, p11-13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28301
Author(s):
Abstract:
Derek Jennings discusses the reasons for why he and his wife decided to homeschool their three youngest children. Jennings decided that homeschooling was a better option to meet each of his children’s individual needs than their current situation in Wake County Schools. The apprehension and curiosity that came with the decision were well rewarded as all three of his children are doing better emotionally and educationally in the homeschool environment than they were in public schools. Many families in Wake County are choosing this option with the school population explosion.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 34, August 2007, p14 Periodical Website
Record #:
36586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Touted as an advantage for homeschooling was developing a connection with nature by learning skills such as growing produce and animal husbandry. Reasons noted for homeschooling included children possessing gifts or challenges traditional schooling is unequipped to handle. While adhering to the state’s core curriculum and assessments, it utilizes teaching methods aligning with learning styles and interests and prioritize mastery over grades. Local support for homeschooled children includes Asheville Arboretum’s EXPLORE and Earthaven Ecovillage.