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5 results for Women in agriculture
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Record #:
5764
Abstract:
Westbrook discusses five women who are making a difference in North Carolina agriculture: Meg Scott Phipps, North Carolina Secretary of Agriculture; Deborah Grant, owner of Agriculture Program Services; Genell Pridgen and Sandra Garner, sheep farmers; and Debbie Roos, Chatham County extension agent.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p98-100, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16132
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Abstract:
Women performed a range of tasks on late 19th- and early 20th-century farms throughout rural North Carolina. Women cared for livestock, grew gardens, and completed household chores.
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Record #:
28023
Abstract:
Chapel Hill resident and beekeeper Liz Lindsey is folklorist who is part of a new generation of beekeepers. The new generation is younger, female, and urban. Males tend to dominate the field, but that is changing. Beekeeping in the state of North Carolina and the various reasons women are being drawn to beekeeping are discussed.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 39, September 2010, p31 Periodical Website
Record #:
31628
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Patricia Stainback Hart of Franklin County is the first woman in twenty-four years ever selected to attend North Carolina State University’s Modern Farming Short Course. This program is open to a select few people who have demonstrated a major interest in agribusiness. Hart inherited the family farm and is now learning the latest farming techniques, economics, and other topics relevant to farm management and operations.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Sept 1976, p14-15, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31629
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Women have played an important role in the agricultural development of America over three and a half centuries. This article discusses the history of women in agriculture during the colonial period, Civil War, and early 1900s. Also discussed are rural women in North Carolina, tomato canning clubs formed for farm girls, and modern women home economics specialists.
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