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6 results for Agribusiness
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Record #:
16247
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Oliver is agriculture adviser to Governor James Martin and agribusiness specialist to the N.C. Department of Commerce. He can walk the walk--he is a farmer and runs a 200-year-old 200-acre Robeson County farm. He is a big promoter of the agribusiness in the state where tobacco, cotton, and peanuts are large crops. He feels as these crops decline farmers should shift to crops like shitake mushrooms, kenaf, and herbs as niche crops. For example, the country imports over $1 billion in herbs, which he would make a nine \"cottage industry\" in the state.
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Record #:
23147
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Agribusiness jobs are on the rise in North Carolina and throughout the nation as well. North Carolina schools, like North Carolina A&T State University, are preparing students for jobs in agribusiness by offering new majors and degrees.
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Record #:
31574
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Robert A. Darr is a farm boy from Iredell County and a pioneer in agribusiness. Next month, Darr retires from a distinguished career in the Farm Credit system. This article discusses Darr’s background and leadership in agribusiness, finance and agri-commodity groups.
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Record #:
31628
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Patricia Stainback Hart of Franklin County is the first woman in twenty-four years ever selected to attend North Carolina State University’s Modern Farming Short Course. This program is open to a select few people who have demonstrated a major interest in agribusiness. Hart inherited the family farm and is now learning the latest farming techniques, economics, and other topics relevant to farm management and operations.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Sept 1976, p14-15, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31629
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Women have played an important role in the agricultural development of America over three and a half centuries. This article discusses the history of women in agriculture during the colonial period, Civil War, and early 1900s. Also discussed are rural women in North Carolina, tomato canning clubs formed for farm girls, and modern women home economics specialists.
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Record #:
38216
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The promise of better food through science was recognized in two initiatives promising to generate growth in jobs, markets for farmers, and manufacturing. One was the Plant Sciences Initiative, the other the Food Processing Innovation Center. Collectively, they promised to produce greater crop numbers, pioneer crop varieties, and lower farm animals’ feed expense. Collectively, they may also help to assure the supply of food needed to feed the world’s population, projected to be 9.6 billion by 2050.