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11 results for School choice
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Record #:
2552
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Believing that public education is failing, proponents of school choice encourage the General Assembly to provide more options for parents, like charter schools, vouchers, tax credits and tuition grants.
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Record #:
2544
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School choice, an educational approach that allows parents to choose the schools their children will attend, encompasses a range of options that include magnet schools, charter schools, and private schools.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Sept 1995, p2-7, 10-11, 15-29, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
2546
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Magnet schools attract students because of their unique academic offerings. They provide many parents an opportunity to enroll their children in schools that develop their particular skills and talents.
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Record #:
2545
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For many parents, school choice does not mean sending their children to special schools or private schools. It means they would rather keep their children closer to home in neighborhood schools.
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Record #:
2547
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A sampling from a number of polls, including Gallup and Lou Harris, reveals that the general public has differing views on the concept of school choice.
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Record #:
2553
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Opponents of school choice options argue that they violate the constitutional separation of church and state and the N.C. Constitution's public purpose clause, and would divert funds from public schools.
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Record #:
19916
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The constitutionality of \"school choice\" is a hotly debated topic amongst politicians and citizens. Republicans are advocating a school voucher system which would take $50 million of state tax revenue away from public schools and reallocate to private education. Incorporating the voucher idea into the state budget may fall short because opponents contend that such a system would allow tax dollars to go to religious institutions.
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Record #:
27589
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The state has partially funded the school voucher program in NC to allow students and parents to choose the schools that are best for them. School vouchers provide $4,200 for low-income students to use to attend private schools they could not afford without the voucher. Opponents argue that this unconstitutional and takes money from public schools. A judge has halted the voucher program and the legality of the program will be decided in the courts.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p18-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27597
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The injunction that halted the voucher program has been overturned by the NC Supreme Court. Now, the General Assembly is moving to add $8 to $10 million to the voucher program. The vouchers provide opportunities for low-income students to attend private or religious schools of their choice. Groups opposing using public funds for private education will appeal, but it is likely to be upheld as constitutional.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 26, June 2014, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
27913
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The Wake County School board is struggling to create a new student assignment plan. Leaders say the plan should reflect the county’s values, stable assignments for kids, choices for parents, efficient use of schools, and diversity in school populations. An outline of the plan was presented at a recent meeting which included dividing the county into regions and assignment zones from which parents can choose the schools their children will attend. Specific details of the plan and the reaction to it are explored.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 16, April 2010, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
35866
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Furthering his education, Wiseman switched to a boarding school six miles from home.