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17 results for Water quality management--Neuse River
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Record #:
19175
Author(s):
Abstract:
From its headwaters to its base in the Pamlico, the Neuse River is troubled waters. With growing pollution inputs, water quality is diminishing and both residents and wildlife run risk of being affected by toxic algae.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 10 Issue 9, Oct 1983, p6, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
33495
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission is considering recommendations to declare the entire Neuse River basin as a nutrient-sensitive watershed. The recommendation is aimed at combatting the causes of algae infestations in the lower Neuse River and reducing nutrient loading of the Pamlico Sound. The nutrient-sensitive designation would enable limits to be imposed on the amount of phosphorus in wastewater discharges into the watershed.
Record #:
33496
Author(s):
Abstract:
A report published by the Water Resources Research Institute concludes that nitrogen loading should be reduced by at least thirty-percent and that phosphorus loading should be reduced by at least fifty-percent to stem algal blooms and support a long-term management strategy for the lower Neuse River.
Record #:
33585
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted in January to classify the lower Neuse River Basin as nutrient sensitive waters. This decision makes the reduction of phosphorus mandatory at the municipal and industrial wastewater treatment facilities. Specific nutrient management strategies have been developed for point and nonpoint source control of nutrients.
Record #:
34148
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to a special report to the Raleigh City Council, the recently enacted state ban on phosphate detergent has improved the phosphate-removal efficiency of the city’s Neuse River Wastewater Treatment Plant and has had an immediate positive impact on water quality in the Neuse River. Additional studies by environmental consultants also show improvements to the phosphate-removal efficiency of wastewater treatment facilities in Greensboro and Durham.
Record #:
34239
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heavy late-spring and early-summer rainfall in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of North Carolina has sent high volumes of nitrogen-laden freshwater down the Neuse River. This has resulted in numerous, small, localized crab and fish kills and several sizeable algae blooms in the estuary near Morehead City.
Record #:
34242
Author(s):
Abstract:
In October, Secretary of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources Jonathan Howes requested that the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission reexamine the plan approved in 1993 for managing nutrients in the Neuse River. Water quality in the Neuse has experienced poor conditions and an angry public hearing prompted the Commission to revisit its management strategies.
Record #:
34246
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted legislative proposals and a “green” budget, which includes funding for efforts to restore water quality in the Neuse River. The goal is to reduce and hold the line on nitrogen loading in a river basin where a rapid increase in human and animal populations shows no signs of abating. Recommendations include restoration of riparian buffers and wetlands.
Record #:
34247
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Water Resources Research Institute has been active in supporting research that addresses key scientific questions of concern for the management of water quality in the Neuse River. In this article, Kenneth Reckhow, director of the institute, discusses dealing with the water quality issues and the uncertainty in scientific studies.
Record #:
34268
Author(s):
Abstract:
The rivers and estuaries of coastal North Carolina have experienced unprecedented increases in nutrient loading over the last fifty years. This has resulted in a proliferation of water quality problems including algae blooms, anoxic water and fish kills. The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources Science Advisory Council recommends continuation of an intensive long-term monitoring and modeling program for the Neuse River Estuary.
Record #:
34272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists are uncertain whether fish kills in the Neuse River are caused by Pfiesteria or anoxia/hypoxia. Difficulties in the causal linkages make it difficult to determine appropriate response and management actions. This article discusses the fish kill events and water conditions in the Neuse.
Record #:
34291
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early 1970s, North Carolina began its fight against excess nutrient pollution, algae blooms and fish kills in the Chowan River. Since then, there have been consistent research and monitoring of the river’s water quality. Today, the Chowan River is a lot healthier and there has been a notable decrease in algal blooms. Long-term efforts in the Neuse River should result in similar success as the Chowan River.
Record #:
34290
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Neuse River Estuary is a troubled ecological system plagued by algae blooms, fish kills, and the toxic dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida. Research by the Neuse ModMon Program confirms that it is likely to take many years for the estuary to return to healthy conditions. Stakeholders in the Neuse Basin understand that restoring the estuary is a long-term project and want to communicate to the public about the State’s responsibilities to the Neuse.
Record #:
34294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Under a tentative agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency on a total maximum daily load (TMDL) for total nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina will consider initiating a new round of rulemaking for the Neuse River Basin. New rules could be adopted by the end of 2001, depending on water quality assessments.
Record #:
34311
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based on chlorophyll-a predictions from the Neuse Estuary Eutrophication Model, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources has recommended no immediate change in the thirty-percent nitrogen reduction goal for the Neuse River Estuary. Scientists caution that changes to the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for total nitrogen could still occur later in the evaluation process.