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85 results for North Carolina--Economic conditions
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Record #:
625
Author(s):
Abstract:
The lingering recession is battering the state's core industries as they adjust to new economic realities in hopes of an economic upswing.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Nov 1991, p20-24, il
Record #:
1009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Both the nation and the state posted positive economic growth for the year 1992.
Source:
North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , Feb 1993, p1-2, il
Record #:
1018
Author(s):
Abstract:
The agricultural economy in North Carolina and throughout the nation improved slightly in 1992; Moore offers a forecast for agricultural performance in 1993.
Source:
Record #:
1122
Abstract:
A survey of city and town officials suggests that economic conditions in Tar Heel cities and towns have either stayed the same or improved in the last year. Most officials feel that property tax rates will not be raised for the coming year.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 43 Issue 5, May 1993, p1,8, por
Record #:
1176
Abstract:
North Carolina is transforming the way in which it was once perceived. This change in image is drastically altering the state's economic base, bringing in new industries while phasing out the traditional industries.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Aug 1993, p12-22, il, por
Record #:
1279
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three leading executives discuss the key factors they see affecting business in the year ahead and what business trends they believe will shape North Carolina's economy.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 11, Nov 1993, p56-60, por
Record #:
1353
Author(s):
Abstract:
Strong private sector job creation in the second quarter of the fiscal year (Oct.-Dec.) has state withholdings and sales tax revenues running ahead of projections, perhaps providing legislators with as much as a $240 million surplus this spring.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 12, Dec 1993, p1-31, il
Record #:
2082
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the century's end, North Carolina's strong economy is fueled by such accomplishments as the Research Triangle Park, low unemployment, a strong banking system, business recruitment, and heavy foreign investment, including Japan's two billion dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 8, Jan 1995, p26-31, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2122
Author(s):
Abstract:
While agricultural and manufacturing jobs have declined over the last twenty years, such other job sectors as government, retail, and service have grown, enabling the state to post a $650 million trade surplus
Record #:
2121
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's 100 counties are divided into seven economic regions for the purpose of promoting each region to attract prospective employers. Regional financing comes from local and state governments and businesses.
Record #:
2287
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using figures from the U.S. Department of Commerce, the Employment Security Commission, and the N.C. Department of Revenue, Greenville economist Dr. James Kleckley, has projected growth rates for the state's 100 counties up to the year 2000.
Record #:
2596
Author(s):
Abstract:
The William C. Friday Fellowship for Human Relations is a two-year program designed to give emerging leaders an understanding of economic and social issues facing the state.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 15 Issue 11, Nov 1995, p54-56,58-59,61-62, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2670
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's seven regional partnerships are profiled in terms of population, per capita income, employment by industry, employment, and retail sales for the years 1985, 1995, and 2005.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p26-29,31,35,37,39,40-41,43, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2687
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's one hundred counties are profiled in terms of population, civilian labor force, building permits, per capita income, and population using food stamps.
Source:
Record #:
3068
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of the state's industries, including furniture, textiles, and tobacco, have declined in recent years, but newer industries, including biotechnology, telecommunications, and auto-parts manufacturing, are rising stars in the state's economy.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Nov 1996, p12,14,16,18,20,22, il