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21 results for Birds--Migration
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Record #:
4741
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Migrating hawks know by instinct when to start, where to go, and how to get there. Each fall they follow well- established routes across North Carolina's mountains and coasts. Lee describes watching hawk migrations over the Outer Banks and lists sites along the coasts and in the mountains where the hawks may be viewed.
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Record #:
4849
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Migratory birds face a number of dangers, both natural and manmade. One adversity coastal fishermen report is bird entanglement in fishing nets. A project funded by a North Carolina Fisheries Resource Grant is investigating whether submerged nets will catch fewer birds than floating ones.
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Record #:
19334
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For several weeks in early fall, millions of birds travel from their breeding grounds in the northern United States and Canada to wintering spots in the southern United States. Since coastal North Carolina is in the flight path of many of these migratory birds, the state's beaches are flooded with transients.
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Record #:
21734
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There is a golden eagle population of 3,000 to 5,000 nesting in Eastern Canada during the summer. Around October they began heading south toward their wintering destination in the Appalachian Mountains. A number of them settle in the state's mountains. Kelly reports on the research being conducted by the Eastern Golden Eagle Working Group at West Virginia University by Dr. Todd Katzner and his group. In 2012-13, the group invited the NC Wildlife Resources Commission to join the study.
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Record #:
24832
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North Carolina is home to both resident and migrant birds throughout the year. Some birds, such as Blue Jays, are permanent residents of the state, while others, like the Prothonotary Warbler are migrants who fly to Central and South America for the winter. Other birds, like the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker migrate from Canada to North Carolina for the winter. This article describes a number of these birds and details their navigational abilities.
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Record #:
25518
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Seventy-five percent of the more than 650 North American bird species migrate twice per year. With the help of radio transmitters, scientists know much more about these long journeys.
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Record #:
25520
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Researchers track golden-winged warblers from Western North Carolina to Central America to better understand this disappearing species. Research findings from the study shows that the loss in population is due to the disappearance of shrubby habitats. The loss in the Appalachian region is in part due to the conversion of agricultural lands to residential areas, changes in grazing practices to favor higher cattle densities, and land use for Christmas tree production.
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Record #:
26460
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The US Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed amendments to the migratory bird treaties with Canada, Mexico, and Japan, allowing spring and summer subsistence hunting.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 6, Jun 1980, p10, 15
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Record #:
9496
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A number of migrating birds either pause and move on or winter in North Carolina. Godfrey describes four of them--the pileated woodpecker, red-winged blackbird, red-tailed hawk, and the eastern bluebird.
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Record #:
1381
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Neotropical migrant birds, commonly referred to as songbirds, are facing a grim future owing to, among other factors, loss of habitat in North America.
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Record #:
3738
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North Carolina Partners in Flight, which started in 1993 with Mark Johns as state coordinator, is part of an international effort to maintain migratory bird populations. It seeks to accomplish this through habitat protection, education, management, and professional training.
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Record #:
4585
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Many of the state's migratory songbirds that summer here and winter in Latin America are declining in numbers. Loss of tropical forests is one factor. Another is the change in the way coffee is grown. With the loss of forests over the last two decades, many birds moved into shaded coffee plantations where coffee plants are grown beneath the trees. Now many farmers are growing high-yield coffee varieties that need sunlight. Almost half of northern Latin America's coffee plantations have converted from shade to sun as of 1990, further reducing songbird habitats.
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Record #:
8232
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Migratory waterfowl have wintered in North Carolina over the centuries. Following some mysterious, invisible pathway through the sky, the birds fly in from the Dakotas, Canada, and far beyond the Artic Circle. Hester describes some of these autumnal visitors, including the mallard, wood duck, northern pintail, American wigeon, and tundra swan.
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Record #:
27282
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In the spring of 1969, blackbirds, cowbirds, and common grackles flew in from Canada and occupied Scotland Neck. The birds became a menace for the townspeople and drew tourists. Scotland Neck residents tried pouring water on the birds and making noise, but the birds stayed until one day in 1970 when they left of their own accord.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p32, 34-35, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
30029
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The soft-plumaged petrel and related species (Pterodroma spp.) remain one of the most poorly known seabird taxa in the Atlantic Ocean. Study observations of petrels off North Carolina and other eastern states reveal the pelagic seabird to be accompanying flocks of mixed bird species during offshore migrations.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p115-123, il, bibl Periodical Website
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