NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Warblers
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
25520
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers track golden-winged warblers from Western North Carolina to Central America to better understand this disappearing species. Research findings from the study shows that the loss in population is due to the disappearance of shrubby habitats. The loss in the Appalachian region is in part due to the conversion of agricultural lands to residential areas, changes in grazing practices to favor higher cattle densities, and land use for Christmas tree production.
Full Text:
Record #:
9682
Author(s):
Abstract:
Warblers either visit or nest in North Carolina. They are among the hardest birds to find and to identify because they are all the same size and come in a confusing array of colors and share similar field marks and songs.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8656
Author(s):
Abstract:
At least forty species of warblers either visit or nest in North Carolina; however, they are among the hardest birds to find and to identify. Warblers are all the same size and come in a confusing array of colors and share similar field marks and songs. Warbler watching can become easier; vegetation, climate, and geography are clues to the type of warbler to be found in a particular location. Some warblers are restricted to types of vegetation growth. Most of the warblers winter in the tropics. Lee discusses a number of warblers and locations for viewing them.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29802
Author(s):
Abstract:
Warblers are often considered the gems of North American bird life and over forty species pass through Western North Carolina during the year. As these songbirds begin migration in April, there are many opportunities to observe and learn about warblers around Asheville. Regular events and walks are held by the Audubon Society, Ventures Birding Tours and other local birders.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
34572
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Swainson’s warbler, popular in the bottomland hardwood swamps of the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, has been researched and watched by the museum staff. By banding the birds and watching them during field excursions, researchers are able to track them, determine nesting and breeding patterns, and overall behavior of the birds.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p20-23, il, por
Record #:
34608
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina native band, the Bowerbirds, based many of their songs off of the work they completed while helping the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The main guitarist and vocalist spent time together working to track the Swainson’s warbler for the museum, and as a result, created poems and songs based on what they experienced in nature.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Winter 2008, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
34718
Author(s):
Abstract:
The golden-winged warbler, native species to North Carolina, has been on the decline since the 1960’s. Little was known about the species until approximately 10 years ago, when different wildlife organizations came together to track their nesting and habitat areas. Recently, migration patterns have been incorporated into the research parameters, and collaboration between several South American researchers has been key.