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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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24 results for Bird watching
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131
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Burgess profiles John Fussell, avid bird watcher and biologist.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan 1992, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4310
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Every fall thousands of migratory birds winter in the eastern part of the state, attracting bird watchers from as far away as Canada, California, and Texas. The Wings Over Water Festival, held in Manteo in November, brings bird watchers together with the local community. Field trips to the Outer Banks, Lake Mattamuskeet, and Alligator River provide good opportunities for wildlife viewing. Other activities include exhibits, a photography contest, and kayaking lessons.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1999, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5809
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Weather and topography in the state make possible the observation of almost eighty percent of all American bird species. Viewing can be enhanced through use of items, including binoculars and guidebooks, and by joining a bird watchers club.
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Record #:
7884
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Starting in the coastal plain, the North Carolina Birding Trail will take birdwatchers to natural areas of rural regions throughout the state. Over thirty states have similar trails that generate millions of ecotourism dollars and provide funds to protect vanishing bird habitats. The nation's oldest birding trail was started in Texas in the early 1980s and is almost 2,110 miles long. When completed, North Carolina's trail will have three regional components. The coastal plains loop, the first section, is scheduled to open in the summer of 2006. This trail will be a driving route that connects birdwatching sites. The goal is to have at least one site in each of the state's 100 counties. A trail book will describe each birding area, including species at the site and nearby points of interest.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p12-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9654
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Some 400 species of birds call North Carolina home for part or all of a year. Several wildlife organizations in the state have collaborated to create a new guide to locate best viewing sites of these birds. Titled North Carolina Birding Trail Coastal Plain Trail Guide, the book contains colorful photos, 102 birding sites, and birding trails, all located east of I-95.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2007, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23735
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Bird watchers track broad trends in avian behavior that may help scientists understand today's environmental health and make predictions about the climatic future.
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Record #:
24438
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Bird watching is making a comeback on the shores of the Outer Banks. About 400 varieties of birds have been documented on the Outer Banks, and the Audubon Society’s Pine Island Wildlife Sanctuary is home to many of them.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p24-26, il
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Record #:
8921
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In this article, Green discusses “The Chat,” which was the official bulletin of the Carolina Bird Club. The publication maintained high stands of content during its more then thirty-five-year history. It remains today a prominent spokesman for a vast group of citizen-environmentalists of the Carolinas.
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Record #:
8917
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Green recounts the history of the Carolina Bird Club over the last thirty-five years. The club organized in Raleigh in March 1937.
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Record #:
5221
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Bird watching is a popular leisure time activity, with over 50 million Americans identifying themselves as bird watchers in a 1996 survey. Lynch provides information on getting started, finding beginning birding trips, what field guide to purchase, and types of binoculars to use.
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Record #:
13126
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Now in its fourteenth year, the Wings Over Water Festival, held in November Manteo and up and down the Outer Banks, brings bird watchers together with the local community. Field trips to the Outer Banks, Lake Mattamuskeet, and Alligator River provide good opportunities for wildlife viewing.
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Record #:
29619
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Ospreys are raptors, or birds of prey, that dive underwater in pursuit of fish. The males also perform an elaborate courtship display, dipping and diving in the air with loud cries while carrying a fish or nesting material to attract a mate. Coastal bird watchers in North Carolina can observe ospreys during their breeding season from early spring through late fall.
Record #:
29802
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Warblers are often considered the gems of North American bird life and over forty species pass through Western North Carolina during the year. As these songbirds begin migration in April, there are many opportunities to observe and learn about warblers around Asheville. Regular events and walks are held by the Audubon Society, Ventures Birding Tours and other local birders.
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Record #:
30659
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The North Carolina Birding Trail covers 310 locations to observe birds. This article highlights several bird watching sites on the trail, and discusses how birding benefits local economies. Also provided is information on birding guides and links to birding resources.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p52-53, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
30866
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North Carolina is home to more than four hundred bird species yearly and is a major destination for birders. An imaginative birding trail project that first began in 2003 can now boast statewide coverage with the release of its final regional birding trail guide. The North Carolina Birding Trail goes into the Coastal Plain, Piedmont and Mountains, and links birders with great birding sites and local attractions.
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