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5 results for North Carolina--Birds
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Record #:
21369
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Famous Boston zoologist William Brewster visited the North Carolina highlands around Asheville for two weeks in 1885 to search for lost bird species and for evidence of which northern birds might nest in the southern mountains. During his expedition, Brewster proved that over 20 northern species nested in the southern Appalachian Mountains during nesting season based primarily on the presence of certain trees and forest types.
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Record #:
21464
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John Abbot was an American naturalist and biological illustrator of the 18th century through whose work the ornithology and entomology of the southeastern coastal plain were examined in minute detail. First visiting Virginia in 1773, Abbott spent the next decades cataloging and studying the birds and insects of the Southeastern United States. In 1797 he published a book of his findings including wonderful watercolors of his specimens in 'The Natural History of the Rarer Lepidopterous Insects of Georgia.'
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Record #:
21500
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In 1809, the father of American ornithology Alexander Wilson took a tour of the South, including North Carolina, to collect information about local birds and drum up subscribers for his extensive and costly book series, 'American Ornithology.' His success in both collecting bird data and subscribers in the South all but assured the success of the book series.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Oct 1986, p421-476 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
25520
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Researchers track golden-winged warblers from Western North Carolina to Central America to better understand this disappearing species. Research findings from the study shows that the loss in population is due to the disappearance of shrubby habitats. The loss in the Appalachian region is in part due to the conversion of agricultural lands to residential areas, changes in grazing practices to favor higher cattle densities, and land use for Christmas tree production.
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Record #:
25519
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cavity-building woodpeckers create habitats for a diverse species within the woodlands of North Carolina. The presence of woodpeckers in the forest changes everything and are classified as keystone species. This label is given to species who have a significant and far-reaching effect on the dynamics of ecosystems.
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