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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Woodpeckers
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Record #:
25519
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cavity-building woodpeckers create habitats for a diverse species within the woodlands of North Carolina. The presence of woodpeckers in the forest changes everything and are classified as keystone species. This label is given to species who have a significant and far-reaching effect on the dynamics of ecosystems.
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Record #:
26066
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The destruction of habitat has made the red-cockaded woodpecker one of the rarest endangered species. The Carolina Conservationist Program is dedicated to protecting habitat for such non-game wildlife populations.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Jan-Feb 1977, p3, 8, il
Record #:
9207
Author(s):
Abstract:
The red-cockaded woodpecker is one of the smallest and least known of the southern woodpeckers, and it is struggling for survival. Only an estimated 10,000 birds remain, and it was declared an endangered species in 1968. The largest concentration of this particular woodpecker in the country is in South Carolina on the Francis Marion National Forest. Muse discusses the recent discovery of the woodpecker in North Carolina on the Boyd estate and nearby Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve.
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Record #:
9687
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Derks seeks to answer why the pileated woodpecker has survived in a changing environment, and its cousin, the ivorybill, is now probably extinct.
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Record #:
9781
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Abstract:
A number of woodpeckers inhabit North Carolina, including the pileated, downy, red-cockaded, red-headed, hairy, red-bellied, and yellow-shafted flicker.
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Record #:
168
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Abstract:
Well adapted to the longleaf pine forests of the Coastal Plain, the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker hangs on.
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Record #:
34717
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The woodpecker is the only animal that has the ability to carve out a habitat with its own natural features. The Red-cockaded woodpecker, the Northern flicker, and the pileated woodpecker, just a few of the native species to North Carolina, carve out habitats that can then be used by other species in the area.
Record #:
36164
Author(s):
Abstract:
A physically and economically feasible solution for the decrease of forests: bird boxes. Among the species that could make this structure for the birds were bluebirds and Carolina wrens.