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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Lloyd, Jared
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Record #:
10174
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Lloyd discusses the work of Full Moon Farm (Black Mountain) and Wolf Sanctum (Bakersville)--two sanctuaries in western North Carolina that create safe havens for discarded wolves and wolf dogs while educating the public about the value of these animals.
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Record #:
25519
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Cavity-building woodpeckers create habitats for a diverse species within the woodlands of North Carolina. The presence of woodpeckers in the forest changes everything and are classified as keystone species. This label is given to species who have a significant and far-reaching effect on the dynamics of ecosystems.
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Record #:
11168
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Lloyd, the winner of the Wildlife in North Carolina 2008 Photo Competition, provides information on taking photos of birds in flight.
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Record #:
12968
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Barrier islands must constantly rebuild themselves, else they will soon disappear. Islands migrate to the west, and winds and ocean overwash are critical factors in this movement. Lloyd discusses how construction on the Outer Banks inhibits these two factors and how this will affect the islands' survival.
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Record #:
14062
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The leatherback sea turtle species is about one hundred million years old. It is also the world's largest turtle and can grow to a length of seven feet, with a flipper span of nine feet and a weight of over one thousand pounds. It can dive to a depth of over 3,900 feet.
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Record #:
17415
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Animals and birds migrate for food and to reproduce. However, it's the \"how they do it\" that is the question researchers haven't answered yet. Some birds make 6,000-mile roundtrips; whales cross oceans; and monarch butterflies fly down to Mexico. All follow the routes of their ancestors, but the \"how\" remains.
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Record #:
18051
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This article seeks to answer the question of why are northern seals seeking out the waters of the state's coast. A decade ago there were no seal sightings. Now over sixty a year are seen along the Outer Banks. Most are primarily first- and second-year pups.
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Record #:
34717
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The woodpecker is the only animal that has the ability to carve out a habitat with its own natural features. The Red-cockaded woodpecker, the Northern flicker, and the pileated woodpecker, just a few of the native species to North Carolina, carve out habitats that can then be used by other species in the area.