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6 results for Rural preservation
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Record #:
18747
Author(s):
Abstract:
Unfortunately, it is a familiar site in rural North Carolina--the loss of the state's rural heritage is growing. Rural preservationists face the problem of vacant and decaying buildings and the loss of physical evidence of the state's former predominantly agricultural culture.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Harrell and Beverly Patterson discuss how the land in eastern North Carolina is still crucial to our communities. Harrell aims to reconnect people with their culture or their agri-culture at the Albermarle Learning Center in Chowan County. Patterson leads a program called the Annenburg Rural Challenge to promote rural folk history and culture.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p2-3, por
Record #:
31367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rural electrification helped to create a whole new way of life for rural people. North Carolina’s rural electric cooperatives have launched a statewide oral history project to preserve the personal recollections of early co-op organizers and the first generation of Tar Heel co-op consumer-members. About fifty volunteers will be tape recording interviews with members and pioneer co-op directors and employees as part of the project.
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Record #:
31589
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Hunt, Governor of North Carolina, is a “country boy” with roots in rural Wilson County. His farming background and family life have been the most important influences preparing him for public service. This article discusses Hunt’s love-thy-neighbor philosophy and his efforts to preserve rural community values.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1977, p8-10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31658
Author(s):
Abstract:
Representative Richardson Preyer serves as the Sixth District’s Congressman and former judge in Greensboro. In this report, Preyer discusses the preservation of rural life, rural development, and health services for rural communities.
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Record #:
38143
Author(s):
Abstract:
For towns of yesteryear, general stores supplied an array of household goods and a community center. Threat to their survival came from the automobile, paved roads, and supermarkets. For many years, Menola’s Country Store of Yesteryear held a remnant of general stores’ onetime presence. After it closed, its artifacts were transported to the Murfreesboro Historical Association and Winborne Museum Store, making the store gone but not forgotten.