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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Energy industries
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Record #:
258
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Utility companies are diversifying into solar products, home insulation, even cable television. But, unlike other corporations, they have a state-awarded monopoly franchise for their principal product.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Jan 1984, p13-27, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
16554
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Leutze discusses the issue of Offshore Energy as it applies to North Carolina.
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Record #:
17110
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Duke Energy Corporation merged with Progress Energy earlier this year but has already fired CEO Bill Johnson. This along with recently divulged industry secrets leads some skeptics to believe the goal of the merger is not to pass savings onto customers but enhance the company's ability to pursue nuclear facilities.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 30, July 2012, p5, 11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17184
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The state's energy industry is growing along with its energy business. The Charlotte region is the epicenter, with 27,800 jobs. Duke Energy Corp. draws engineering and manufacturing companies to the region from around the world. Legislation requiring utilities to produce energy from renewable sources is also powering growth. Five business leaders from around the state met recently to discuss their industry. BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine provides a transcript of their discussions.
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Record #:
26822
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Within the next decade, massive synthetic fuel plants will be constructed throughout the country. They will be designed to convert one type of fuel into another. The construction of these plants will present environmental problems, such as the release of toxic substances that can threaten human health.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 7, July 1981, p2, il
Record #:
27690
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Colleges and universities in North Carolina are now using high-tech classrooms and partnerships with major industries to help educate the next generation of energy workers.
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Record #:
28355
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Duke Energy and ConocoPhillips have donated 3.5 million dollars to Duke University’s Climate Change Policy Partnership (CCPP) and that financial support may have influenced public policy. The money may have influenced members of the CCPP’s advisory panel and affected its the ability to vet climate policy research before it is released to the public. Anti-regulatory policy statements have been published under the CCPP’s name and critics say that its research has been skewed because of the two companies support.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 49, December 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
29651
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While the energy industry is big for North Carolina, business is important to the energy industry. North Carolina energy helps businesses be more successful by promoting energy efficiency. Energy programs in the state are diverse, from tips and newsletters to planning and distribution systems.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p24-25, por
Record #:
30979
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North Carolina is looking for renewable energy sources and alternatives to help improve energy efficiency and reduce demand. However, there are significant obstacles to acquire these resources and the costs are expensive. This article discusses current energy sources in North Carolina, environmental conditions, and some of the challenges in energy conservation.
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Record #:
31576
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The North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives Women’s Committee annual fall workshop was held in Greensboro, October 10-11. The workshop featured energy industry speakers who discussed the basics of nuclear energy, rural power supply, and alternative energy sources. Sandra Plant, information officer for the controversial Clinch River Breeder Reactor project in Tennessee, discussed how the breeder operates and safety of nuclear power production.
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Record #:
32012
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At the 29th annual meeting of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, rural electric leaders, including representatives of North Carolina’s electric membership, considered the dimensions of the energy crisis. This article discusses how North Carolina plans to find solutions in obtaining an adequate supply of dependable, economical electric power.
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Record #:
32659
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Public Service Company of North Carolina, Inc., is diversifying and restructuring its operations into five new subsidiaries. The subsidiaries will focus on natural resources, energy, natural gas and oil exploration, and propane production. Public Service is expecting continued rapid growth of its utility operations and is making plants to accommodate that growth.
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Record #:
36299
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A positive economic and occupational impact in North Carolina is possible through its growth in industries such as alternate energy. Such an impact is also perceived worldwide. Attesting to this domestic and international impact is insights from eight of the industry’s experts.