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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Energy industry--North Carolina
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Record #:
20314
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Although founded in Charlotte, the North Carolina energy industry is connected to all regions of the state, and is preparing for the future by contributing to education and technology.
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Record #:
24794
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Journalist Edward Martin speculates about the future of North Carolina’s energy industry in the next decade. Based on current patterns, he predicts that natural gas may become a top energy source by 2026, that nuclear plants will grow, and that the role of renewable energy is still unknown.
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Record #:
24826
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The Amazon Wind Farm US East in Northeastern North Carolina is the region’s largest economic-development project and is the first commercial-scale wind farm in the Southeast. This wind farm brings to light the debate over government’s role in promoting alternatives to natural energy resources like coal, gas, and nuclear power.
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Record #:
28009
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Wind is the next big energy supply for the state of North Carolina. A recent study by UNC showed the state’s enormous potential for offshore wind energy and scientist, energy companies, and utilities are determining to make it a reality. The cost for beginning to capture wind energy would be great and it would take up to 10 years to generate power. The great potential for wind energy in the state is detailed and experts weigh in on its future in the state.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 36, September 2010, p9-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27984
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The state is debating their position on woody biomass. Wood is considered a renewable resource, but only if policies are in place to prevent clear-cutting. Studies show that burning wood for energy releases more greenhouse gases than coal, but the North Carolina Forestry Association and others still support burning wood. The environmental and health effects of cutting down trees to use for fuel are explored.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28473
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The fast-growing residential solar market means more business for Sunlight Financial. The company was founded in 2014 to provide loans to homeowners installing solar-energy systems. Solar has a significant economic impact and Sunlight Financial helps deliver those benefits to private owners.
Record #:
29120
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North Carolina is quickly becoming the energy industry's leader. With new sources of energy, including renewables and gas, companies are also modernizing technology and partnering with educational institutions to train a better workforce.
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Record #:
29765
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In the Charlotte region of North Carolina, a new industry is growing, guided by existing businesses and multi-million dollar projects. Companies such as Duke Energy, Westinghouse Electric Group, and the Shaw Group, along with efforts such as the Energy Production and Infrastructure Center (EPIC) at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the region is becoming the leader in the power industry and green energy.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p16-17, por, map
Record #:
30652
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The United States Environmental Protection Agency is considering new environmental standards for coal power plants that would tighten regulations limiting power plant emissions. While North Carolina is less dependent on coal-fired generation than the rest of the nation, there will be impacts to existing power plants. This article discusses the history of North Carolina energy, and what cooperatives are doing to balance regulations and costs.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p12-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
36299
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A positive economic and occupational impact in North Carolina is possible through its growth in industries such as alternate energy. Such an impact is also perceived worldwide. Attesting to this domestic and international impact is insights from eight of the industry’s experts.