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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for Energy policy
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Record #:
257
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Deregulation, diversification, and alternative energy sources are important concerns of state regulators, who still have substantial power over utility operations despite increased federal involvement.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Jan 1984, p2-12, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
27768
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The state just released a draft report on fracking that outlines the many dangers of fracking, but concludes that it can be completed safely if properly regulated. Governor Beverly Perdue and the Department of Energy and Natural Resources recently opposed fracking, but have suddenly reversed their views over the past few weeks. All indications are that the state does not have the regulations, the enforcement, or the infrastructure in place for fracking and to prevent environmental disasters caused by fracking, but will look to go ahead with the practice anyway.
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Record #:
27884
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The University of North Carolina is considered a regional leader on environmental issues but continues to burn thousands of tons of coal each year in its power plants. The university is in debt on its cogeneration power plant and will have to burn coal until at least 2022. Several groups have called for the university to end coal use in five years, but that will not be possible. The various ways UNC is examining to go carbon neutral by 2050 are explored.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 12, March 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28009
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Wind is the next big energy supply for the state of North Carolina. A recent study by UNC showed the state’s enormous potential for offshore wind energy and scientist, energy companies, and utilities are determining to make it a reality. The cost for beginning to capture wind energy would be great and it would take up to 10 years to generate power. The great potential for wind energy in the state is detailed and experts weigh in on its future in the state.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 36, September 2010, p9-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27984
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The state is debating their position on woody biomass. Wood is considered a renewable resource, but only if policies are in place to prevent clear-cutting. Studies show that burning wood for energy releases more greenhouse gases than coal, but the North Carolina Forestry Association and others still support burning wood. The environmental and health effects of cutting down trees to use for fuel are explored.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27983
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New studies show North Carolina has more potential to produce renewable energy than the state is planning to use. With the decreasing cost of solar power and the advancements in energy technology, the state should make use of the technology and readjust its energy goals. Statistics and graphs detail the potential the state has to increase its use of solar power, wind power, biofuels, and hydroelectric over the next few years to become a leader in the Southeast.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28241
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North Carolina ranked fourth in the nation in increases of global warming pollution from 1990-2004. Clean energy legislation is currently working to address the issue, but most of the discussion about the problem and solutions are a mystery. The Energy Issues Working Group is responsible for meeting and discussing the bill, but its meetings are not well publicized and the chairman of the group wants to keep it that way. Some of the changes proposed in a senate bill to address the clean energy problem and plan are detailed and members comment on the groups meeting process.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 16, April 2007, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
29776
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It may seem easy to just replace nonrenewable energy sources with renewable ones. But in North Carolina even those sources that seem ideal for emissions have drawbacks in the form of land needs, cost, capacity, and even aesthetics.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p18, 20, por
Record #:
30652
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The United States Environmental Protection Agency is considering new environmental standards for coal power plants that would tighten regulations limiting power plant emissions. While North Carolina is less dependent on coal-fired generation than the rest of the nation, there will be impacts to existing power plants. This article discusses the history of North Carolina energy, and what cooperatives are doing to balance regulations and costs.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p12-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30677
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North Carolina enacted the nation's first state law regulating disposal of coal ash. The General Assembly considered the legislation after a pipe ruptured in February at a coal ash basin near Duke Energy's generating plant in Rockingham County, resulting in coal ash spilling into the Dan River. Electric cooperatives have been engaged in this discussion because a portion of the electricity they supply comes from wholesale power agreements with Duke Energy and other providers.
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Record #:
30856
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The American Energy and Security Act establishes nationwide mandates on renewable energy and energy efficiency, requires reductions in greenhouse gases, and is the most costly federal energy bill in decades. North Carolina electric cooperatives met with Congress to discuss major energy and environmental legislation proposals. The implications for North Carolina consumers is discussed in this article.
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Record #:
30854
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North Carolina electric cooperatives are working with Congress to develop energy policies that balance reductions in greenhouse gas emissions while assuring reliable and affordable electric services. This article discusses the cap and trade system, and current efforts to develop renewable energy in the state.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 5, May 2009, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30898
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New energy policy legislation requires electric cooperatives, by 2018, to have ten percent of their total electricity needs generated from renewable resources or displaced through effective energy efficiency programs. More renewable energy for North Carolina will need an upgraded transmission network to go where it will be needed.
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Record #:
30980
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North Carolina’s electric cooperatives distribute electricity produced from a variety of sources including carbon-neutral nuclear generation, natural gas, diesel generation, coal, hydro and renewable resources. This diversity of energy resources helps ensure that electricity remains reliable and as affordable as possible. New state legislation mandates that three percent of electric cooperatives’ energy be met through renewable energy products.
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Record #:
30996
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Two of the most watched contests this election season are the statewide races for the United States Senate and North Carolina Governor. In this article, the candidates discuss their energy policy plans and approach to climate change legislation.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 10, Oct 2008, p12-15, il, por Periodical Website
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