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34 results for Moravians
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Record #:
181
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Old Salem's Moravian Easter Sunrise Service has inspired the faithful for generations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 11, Apr 1992, p16-17, il
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Record #:
4374
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In the winter of 1753, the Moravian church in Pennsylvania sent twelve young men to the Piedmont section of North Carolina to start a settlement which they called Bethabara. This village gave way in the 1760s to the newer town of Salem. Several of Bethabara's original buildings and stone foundations remain. Today the state's first Moravian settlement is a historic site and city park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 7, Dec 1999, p114-116, 118-119 Periodical Website
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Record #:
6409
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David Tannenburg, born in Germany in 1728, is considered the foremost North American organ builder of the 18th century. The organ he built for the Moravians, called the Great Organ, was installed in the home Moravian Church in Salem in 1800. This organ, silent for the past 100 years, has been restored. Of the 644 original pipes, 628 were located and used in the restoration.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 8, Jan 2004, p102-104, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7526
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The first love feast North Carolina was held in November 1753 in the historic Moravian settlement in Forsyth County. Since then, this communal celebration has become standard holiday fare for many churches across the state. Duncan discusses what distinguishes a Moravian-style Christmas love feast from candlelight Christmas Eve services of other denominations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p96-100, 102, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9260
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Swiss-born Moravian Christian Winkler first came to Salem in 1807 where he and his descendants operated a bakery until the late 1920s. In 1968, Old Salem, Inc. restored the building, and manager Mary Jane Smith and her employees make Moravian breads, cookies, and cakes. They wear outfits appropriate to the time period, and still use the big brick oven originally installed in the bakery. In 1977, Winkler Bakery began packaging and selling its sugar cake mix so that people could make the confection in their own homes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 2, July 1978, p14-16, il
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Record #:
10318
Abstract:
Founded in 1766, the Moravian village of Old Salem in Winston-Salem is becoming one of the country's foremost historical attractions. Each year over 30,000 visitors walk its streets and tour its historic buildings.
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Record #:
10341
Author(s):
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Andreas Kremser, a Moravian who lived in the Single Brothers House in Salem, was killed when an excavation at the house collapsed on him. Duncan recounts sightings of him up till 1950, when a visiting minister determined that he should “lay the ghost.”
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 5, Oct 2008, p126-128, 130,, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11460
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Parham describes the impressive services which are held every Christmas Eve at the Moravian Church in Winston-Salem. The services antedate the Revolutionary War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 30, Dec 1933, p1-2, il
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Record #:
11869
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The North Carolina Moravians had to temper their pacifism with some dependence on force concerning the native Indians in the western part of the state. The worst of the troubles came during the French and Indian Wars as the Cherokees \"sold\" their land in the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals from 1754-1770. Fighting in the Northern colonies drove many Moravians into the Carolinas, particularly Bethabara, and after 1779, Bethania. Despite their scruples against bearing arms, the Moravians established a militia headed by Brother Jacob Loesch.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 2, June 1961, p11-12, il
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Record #:
11872
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Indian troubles obliged Moravians in North Carolina to live close to each other in a village for mutual protection, continuing a communal economy far longer than at first intended. Overcrowded by refugees, the original settlement in Bethabara expanded to a second location in the Black Walnut Bottoms. In 1749, the British Parliament specifically recognized the Moravians as an honorable Episcopal Church, allowing them to continue their lives within the framework of the Anglican Church.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 3, July 1961, p18-20
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Record #:
11876
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At the end of 1776, Bethabara and Bethania housed a large portion of the Moravian brethren, with Salem set to stand as the new community by 1773. The new town became the center of the Wachovia settlement, attracting professional men such as a doctor, apothecary, and surveyor. Salem soon became a craft and manufacturing center, offering a full slate of services including weaving, tanning, and distilling. Salem was founded on the Moravian principle of oecononie, whereby the means of production were owned by the community, and the goods they produced were shared in kind
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p8
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Record #:
11986
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Griffin discusses the restoration project being carried out at the Moravian village known as Old Salem. Moravians founded the town in 1766 and unlike many early American towns it was a planned community.
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Record #:
12661
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Abstract:
At the end of 1776, Bethabara and Bethania housed a large portion of the Moravian brethren, with Salem set to stand as the new community by 1773. The new town became the center of the Wachovia settlement, attracting professional men such as a doctor, apothecary, and surveyor. Salem soon became a craft and manufacturing center, offering a full slate of services including weaving, tanning, and distilling. Salem was founded on the Moravian principle of oecononie, whereby the means of production were owned by the community, and the goods they produced were shared in kind.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p8-9, 27
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Record #:
12671
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In the ninth story of the Moravian series, the author discusses the strict controls exercised by two groups in Salem. As the community began to prosper, simple communal living was abandoned resulting in new forms of control for the spiritual and financial matters of the society. The Aeltesten Conferenz was responsible for the spiritual affairs of the congregation, while the Aufseher Collegium was established to look after the secular, or financial, affairs of the community.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p8
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Record #:
12681
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Music was as much a part of the Moravians' religions life as prayer, and of all their traditions, music is one of the oldest and deepest seated. Several Moravians that came to America knew and worked with the leading musicians of the time. By 1746, the Moravians in Bethlehem were using an organ to accompany their singing.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 7, Sept 1961, p13-14, por
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