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7 results for Forests and forestry--History
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Record #:
181
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Abstract:
Old Salem's Moravian Easter Sunrise Service has inspired the faithful for generations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 11, Apr 1992, p16-17, il
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Record #:
4374
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Abstract:
In the winter of 1753, the Moravian church in Pennsylvania sent twelve young men to the Piedmont section of North Carolina to start a settlement which they called Bethabara. This village gave way in the 1760s to the newer town of Salem. Several of Bethabara's original buildings and stone foundations remain. Today the state's first Moravian settlement is a historic site and city park.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 7, Dec 1999, p114-116, 118-119 Periodical Website
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Record #:
6409
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Abstract:
David Tannenburg, born in Germany in 1728, is considered the foremost North American organ builder of the 18th century. The organ he built for the Moravians, called the Great Organ, was installed in the home Moravian Church in Salem in 1800. This organ, silent for the past 100 years, has been restored. Of the 644 original pipes, 628 were located and used in the restoration.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 8, Jan 2004, p102-104, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6672
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Abstract:
The Moravians arrived in the Yadkin Valley in 1753. Davis discusses the use they made of the forest there. Hickory provided fine firewood and food from the nuts. Yellow poplar gave them boards for their buildings. The chestnut could also be used as a substitute for coffee. Before an apothecary shop was built, drugs came from the forest floor and included snake root as an antidote for venom and carpenter leaf for fresh wounds.
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Record #:
34960
Abstract:
The first forestry plan in the United States was created for Biltmore Estates by Gifford Pinchot. This would change how the country viewed forest conservation, making it both profitable and practical. Pinchot’s successor, Dr. Carl Schenck, created a forestry school to teach the new generation of forester management skills and techniques. Together, these two men created took European models and tailoring to the American landscape.
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Record #:
34961
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Abstract:
John Simcox Holmes was the first forester in North Carolina, and for a long time, the only forester in the state. By conducting interviews and surveys all along the state, Holmes was able to take charge in 1915 and slow the destruction of the forests. His long list of successes includes establishing a fire warden budget, protecting Mount Mitchell as a state park, establishing nurseries to grow replacement trees for deforested areas, and writing “Common Forest Trees of North Carolina, How to Know Them”, which is still in use today.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p144-150, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34959
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is known as the birth place of American forestry. Pioneers in the field such as Gifford Pinchot and Dr. Carl Schenk began their work in North Carolina, and created tactics such as prescribed burns, selective thinning, and management plans. This has ensured a profitable logging industry while keeping forests sustainable and healthy.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p120-134, il, por, map Periodical Website
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