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23 results for Christmas
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Record #:
81
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Christmas traditions and activities across the state are as diverse as the citizens of the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 7, Dec 1991, p20-25, il
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Record #:
2071
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To encourage the Christmas mood, North Carolina offers a number of seasonal events each year. They include Christmas at the Biltmore Estate, Festival of Trees in Wilmington, the Historic Oakwood Tour in Raleigh, and a Christmas Candle Tea at Old Salem.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 7, Dec 1994, p16-21, il
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Record #:
3080
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Variety is the key word to describe the state's Christmas celebrations, which include light festivals, flotillas, and holiday tours of homes. Two of the largest are Asheville's Light Up Your Holidays and Winston-Salem's Tanglewood Festival of Light.
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Record #:
3115
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To visit at Christmastime the Moravian village of Old Salem in Winston-Salem is to step back a century and experience Christmas without modern-day traditions or conveniences.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 7, Dec 1996, p24-26, 35, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3114
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Tours of decorated homes during the Christmas season are a tradition, and many towns, including Asheville, Todd, Mount Airy, and Edenton, display their Southern hospitality during visits to their oldest and best homes.
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Record #:
7522
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The residents of Portsmouth Island, Core Banks, and Shackleford Banks are long gone. Churches, houses, and graveyards stand silent. Hurricanes and dwindling jobs drove them away. Their descendants, though scattered among Carteret, Pamlico, Hyde, and Dare Counties, continue the old island traditions of Christmas. A number of them share their remembrances with Biro.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p68-70, 72, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8426
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Josephus Daniels, the famous editor of the Raleigh News and Observer, served his country as Secretary of the Navy during the administration of President Woodrow Wilson and as Ambassador to Mexico during the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Lucy Davis Inman, his granddaughter, describes a typical Christmas celebration at her grandfather's house.
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Record #:
8698
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At age ten, Reverend Charles Keyes of Hickory discovered the true meaning of Christmas. Several of his friends had received nothing for Christmas, and Charles bought them candy and chewing gum. He began delivering mini-sermons at the age of four, becoming known as The Parson in later years. These days, he plays Santa Claus to the mountain people of five states, delivering tractor-trailer loads of clothes, food, and toys in the early part of December each year. The Parson also opened Camp Joy in Hickory, a summer camp where underprivileged children come for a week and are taken on a shopping spree at the week's end.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 7, Dec 1981, p16-18, 29, il
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Record #:
9589
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North Carolina towns celebrate Christmas in a variety of ways. One of the most unique is held in Oriental, a small town on the banks of the Neuse River best known as the “Sailing Capital of North Carolina.” Since 1986, the town has hosted a weekend-long Spirit of Christmas festival complete with a brightly lit flotilla, lots of food and drink, and a lively parade.
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Record #:
10713
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Although the Salem Christmas 1800 program is only in its third year, it is already considered a great success, having attracted more than 3,000 people from the Winston-Salem area last year. The program, sponsored by Old Salem, Inc., features live actors portraying the sights and sounds of a traditional Moravian Christmas as it would have been celebrated 169 years ago. Records show that the Moravians had few distinctive Christmas customs and that holiday celebrations were largely a continuation of the closely-knit community life as it was lived day by day.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 13, Dec 1969, p10-11, 31, il
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Record #:
11460
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Parham describes the impressive services which are held every Christmas Eve at the Moravian Church in Winston-Salem. The services antedate the Revolutionary War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 30, Dec 1933, p1-2, il
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Record #:
14161
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Riding the Fantastic, Ragamuffin Riders, the DQI's, the Kooner-johns - all of these events played a prominent part in celebrating the Yuletide season many years ago.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 29, Dec 1949, p3, 20, il
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Record #:
14667
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The John Kuners played an important part in the observance of Christmas in North Carolina during the ante-bellum days and are believed to have obtained their start in Wilmington.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 8, July 1944, p7
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Record #:
16430
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When German immigrants came to the Piedmont in the 18th-century, they brought with them their beliefs and customs, their ways and traditions, their lore and legends, and many of the customs associated with one of the most prominent religious holidays--Christmas. Many of the most beloved Christmas symbols are a part of the heritage received from the Germans.
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Record #:
24464
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Christmas is a mix of Pagan and Christian-rooted customs and this article presents how Christmas was celebrated in early North Carolina. It covers topics such as fireworks, gifting, caroling, superstitions, and tree decoration.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 7, December 1990, p27-29
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