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9 results for Roosevelt, Franklin Delano, 1882-1945
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Record #:
10634
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Abstract:
In 1936, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's private train was involved in an accident in Wilson, NC. According to the one reporter at the scene, a vehicle driven by A.T. Smith stalled on the tracks before the President's train arrived. With no warning available, the President's train collided with Smith's car at approximately 11:45 p.m. The Secret Service investigated, and the Presidential train resumed its journey to Washington, D.C. The White House didn't mention the accident until being asked about it two days later.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 14, Dec 1970, p16, il
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Record #:
14404
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Abstract:
Folks still talk about President Franklin D. Roosevelt's trip from the mountains to Charlotte in September 1936. Vast throngs of residents greeted him along the entire route.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 16, Sept 1947, p5, 20, f
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Record #:
14836
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In addition to numerous occasions when he merely passed through the state, President Franklin D. Roosevelt made four formal visits to North Carolina during his tenure of office.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 47, Apr 1945, p9, 22
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Record #:
15052
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The exercises in connection with the formal dedication of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park took place at Newfound Gap, right over the Tennessee-North Carolina state line. As well as the enormous crowds, President and Mrs. Roosevelt were there as were officials and dignitaries from around the country and world.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 15, Sept 1940, p1-3, 28, f
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Record #:
23367
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Abstract:
January 30th, Franklin D. Roosevelt's birthday, became a day dedicated to raising money for polio research and treatment. In 1934, nearly 5,000 communities, including Greenville, held their first ball, raising over one million dollars for the Warm Springs Foundation and Rehabilitation Institute. Balls, shows, benefits, and auctions continued in Greenville until 1948.
Record #:
35932
Abstract:
If asked to identify visionaries for flight, one might consider the Wright Brothers. Someone else with maven status for advocating airplanes, but perhaps not so well known was General Billy Mitchell. Largely unpopular during his time, Mitchell’s assertion of combining aircraft and naval operations gradually gained support through the efforts of the then Secretary of the Navy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p44-45
Record #:
36148
Abstract:
The window, located on the roof of the William B. Blades House, offered an extensive look into history. It had a bird’s eye view of the Great Fire of 1922, trio of hurricanes, Tryon Palace’s construction, the Bicentennial celebration, and election of the town’s first black mayor. Nationally famous figures referenced by this poem’s fifth grade author included Babe Ruth, President Harry S. Truman, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Record #:
38061
Abstract:
Working apace during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to bring electrical power to North Carolina were linesmen. As the author illuminated, their job was dangerous and goal formidable. Despite President Roosevelt’s creation of the Rural Electrification Authority in the 1930s, three decades passed before almost every residence was electrified.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 6, November 2014, p38-40, 42, 44, 46-47 Periodical Website
Record #:
38258
Author(s):
Abstract:
Described by the author and displayed in photographs by Patrick Schneider is a Waterside Theatre performance of Paul Green’s The Lost Colony. Words and pictures collaboratively explain the enduring mystique of his play and the Roanoke Island colonists’ story.
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