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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for White, John, fl. 1585-1593
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Record #:
9386
Author(s):
Abstract:
John White, the second Caucasian artist in America, was an explorer and competent mapmaker commissioned by Sir Walter Raleigh to publicize the new domain of Queen Elizabeth. In 1585 White painted many landscapes, fauna and floral studies, and scenes of the daily lives of the Native Americans.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p9-11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
10129
Abstract:
Sir Walter Raleigh commissioned John White to publicize the new domain of Queen Elizabeth. White's watercolor depictions of 16th-century Roanoke Island gave Europeans their first look at the previously unexplored territory.
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Full Text:
Record #:
19
Abstract:
Smith provides black and white reproductions of John White's paintings representing the box turtle, diamond back terrapin, loggerhead turtle, West Indian iguana, and crocodile, as well as a brief account of White's role in the history of American exploration.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 16, July 1990, p119-131, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29209
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sir John White was one of the first men to explore what would become North Carolina, and served as governor of the ill-fated Lost Colony. He was also a highly observant artist, whose detailed sketches and paintings are among the best records of the North Carolina coast and its native population at the time of European exploration.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p28-30, il
Record #:
37306
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Historic Bath Foundation opened an exhibit hall in a renovated section of the town’s old high school building. Bringing history to life were exhibits such as Blackbeard, featuring an historic interpreter for the pirate who had a house in Bath. Putting history on display were artifacts, such as Theodore DeBry illustrations from 1590; historic maps; and antique firearms. Preserving history was extended to maintaining much of the original architectural structure of the 1920s building while adding a library, gallery, gift shop, and town offices.
Record #:
35878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Roanoke was getting ready for its quadricentennial celebration. Part of the preparation: building a replica of the ship that brought the colonists ashore and Lost Colony Center near Waterside Theatre. As for the celebration, flora and fauna paintings of disappeared colonist John White was being remembered as much as the disappearance itself.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p40-41
Record #:
38121
Author(s):
Abstract:
Helping to preserve the past is the current Historic Bath Exhibit Center, formerly Bath High School. Even if the word museum is not part of its title, the facility acts as such. Fulfilling this function are seasonal exhibits, like the summer’s history of barbecue exhibit, long term exhibits like Theodore de Bry illustrations, and anticipated long term exhibit about Blackbeard.