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Record #:
7532
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stephen Jackson of Brevard is the founder, owner, and curator of the one-of-a-kind aluminum Christmas tree museum. These shiny trees were popular in the mid-20th-century. Now in its ninth year, the mobile seasonal display contains nearly 100 trees. Foster has compiled an extensive list of around 40 manufacturers of this type of tree, their production dates, and descriptions of over 30 different kinds of branches.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p134-136, 138, 140, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8578
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Brunswick County, people recycle their Christmas trees by placing them on the beach and allowing the ocean to repair the dunes. The trees catch and hold the sand which the ocean pushes over them and, as they disintegrate over the course of the first year, plants root in the newly formed dunes. Old dunes can be ruined by such things as dune buggies or storms, and the Christmas trees help to reform the dunes each year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 7, Dec 1982, p21-22, il
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Record #:
26407
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although many believed that President Theodore Roosevelt hated Christmas trees as a tradition, his banning of them in White House was actually a matter of forest conservation.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 6, Dec 1979, p7, 15
Record #:
7693
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Deal family, owners of the Smokey Holler Tree Farm, at Laurel Springs in Alleghany County, was selected to send a Christmas tree to the White House in 2005. The family earned the coveted honor by winning the North Carolina Christmas Tree Contest and becoming the 2005 Grand Champions.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
38138
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditions associated with Christmas, German immigrant style, are still part of the Yuletide season for many North Carolinians. Traditions traced back to German immigrants also with a religious base include the Moravians’ Putz, a nativity related decoration, and Lebkuchen, a cookie. A holiday tradition with a somewhat dubious origin was the Christmas tree, this decoration possibly brought in by Hessian soldiers during the Revolutionary War.