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9 results for Surfing--Outer Banks
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Record #:
4303
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Abstract:
Surfing has become very popular along the Outer Banks, especially in the Cape Hatteras area where steepening and narrowing of the continental shelf creates big waves. Surfing has grown more family-oriented, and membership in the Outer Banks Surfing Association numbers over 400. Over the past decade surf shops have multiplied threefold. There are surfing restrictions, such as avoiding piers and wearing ankle ropes, but surfers champion coastal issues, working for clean water, clean beaches, and beach access.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1999, p14-17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
29929
Author(s):
Abstract:
Considered one of the best spots for surfing on the east coast, Cape Hatteras is known for its ocean swells and strong storms. The closeness of the continental shelf and shipwrecks build up bars that create the perfect place for large crashing waves.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p44-47, por
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Record #:
34371
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The Outer Banks has long been a mecca for East Coast surfers, ever since the surfboard was introduced to the area in 1928. Jim “Biggie” Vaughn, owner of Whalebone Surf Shop in Nags Head, discusses the local surf culture, contribution of surfing to the economy and environment, and conditions which make the Outer Banks an ideal location for surfers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2018, p122-128, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34373
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Kill Devil Hills, Nags Head, Wrightsville Beach, and Rodanthe are among the best surf spots on the East Coast. This article discusses the surf conditions, notable surfers and communities in each of these four beach towns.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2018, p133-146, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34372
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina surfing began in 1910, when Burke Haywood Bridgers of Wrightsville Beach wrote to a newspaper in the hopes that Hawaiians would share their surfing secrets. This article covers the history of surfing in the state, famous surfers, and surf competitions.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2018, p130-131, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34376
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Abstract:
Legendary East Coast surfer Jo Pickett travels the world surfing. But she makes her home in Wilmington, where North Carolina’s swells remind her of family and the importance of living fearlessly. Pickett started the Crystal South Surf Camp in Wrightsville Beach, which is also the location of the Wahine Classic Surfing Competition.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2018, p171-175, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34377
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Tony Silvagni is a world champion longboard surfer and owner of the Tony Silvagni Surf School in Carolina Beach. According to Silvagni, Carolina Beach is an ideal place to learn to surf. This article discusses Silvagni’s accomplishments and how he started his own surfing school.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2018, p177-180, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34375
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In the 1980s, three Atlantic Beach surf shops were established, giving surfers a social network and sense of identity. This article highlights the owners of Bert’s, AB, and Marsh’s, and their roles in developing the Eastern Surfing Association and surfing community.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2018, p160-168, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35917
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Abstract:
The author suggested Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci could not have imagined what would become of the sparse strip of land standing between the Atlantic Ocean and Coastal mainland. How much has become of the Outer Banks was in its attraction power to residents and visitors, activities like sand surfing and sailing, hand gliding and sunbathing.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p50-55