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Record #:
7039
Author(s):
Abstract:
Williams describes an incident of World War II having a North Carolina connection. On May 11, 1942, off the North Carolina coast, the German submarine U-558 sank HMS Bedfordshire, a British naval ship on submarine patrol. All thirty-seven British sailors were killed. Days later four bodies from the ship washed up on Ocracoke Island. Residents buried the four in a small plot. Later the United States ceded the land to England in perpetuity for one dollar. Each May memorial services are held there by military representatives from Canada, England, and the United States.
Source:
Record #:
10733
Author(s):
Abstract:
The German submarine U-558 sank HMS Bedfordshire, a British naval ship on submarine patrol duty off Ocracoke Island in May 1942, killing thirty-seven British sailors. Four bodies from the ship washed up on Ocracoke Island. Residents buried them in a small plot. Later, the United States ceded the land to England in perpetuity for one dollar.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 9, Feb 2009, p31-32, 34-35, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10740
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War II England sent many ships to patrol the northeast coast of the United States, especially the area between Norfolk and Cape Hatteras. One such patrol ship, The H.M.S. BEDFORDSHIRE, was sunk by German submarines off Ocracoke Island and the bodies of four of its crewmen washed ashore on May 14, 1942. A local resident discovered the bodies and notified the Coast Guard who recovered the bodies, brought them into the village, and arranged for identification. Lt. Aycock Brown, USN, flew in from Norfolk to identify the bodies, one of which he recognized as Lt. Thomas Cunningham, a man with whom he had shared a meal in Norfolk only three days before the sinking of the Bedfordshire. Seaman Stanley Craig was wearing an identification tag and the other two bodies remain unidentified. The seamen were buried on land donated by Mrs. Alice Williams and given a memorial service organized by Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Rondthaler. Yearly memorial services still take place, and the gravesite is maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard and the Ocracoke Boy Scouts.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 21, Apr 1970, p9, il
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