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15 results for Tar Heel Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979
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Record #:
6528
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in 1970, Raven Rock State Park is one of North Carolina's newest parks. It is located along the Cape Fear River and takes its name from the flocks of ravens that roosted there years ago. Its main feature is Raven Rock, which reaches a height of 152 feet and juts out at a forty-five degree angle above the river. Clemmons describes the location, length, and difficulty of the park's six hiking trails.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p46-47, il
Record #:
35698
Author(s):
Abstract:
NC’s plays about the Lost Colony of Roanoke, Blackbeard, Tom Dooley, Daniel Boone, and Andrew Jackson may come as no surprise. This state was a home for the famous pirate and Elizabethan era English settlers, the subject of the popular song, battle site for this Revolutionary War freedom fighter, and settlement that included Jackson’s parents. Plays about NC’s perhaps lesser known ways of involvement in the Revolutionary War included Fight for Freedom, about the first Declaration of Independence document; The Liberty Cart, about the Battle of Moore’s Creek. As for contributions from religious groups, there was Sound of Peace, about a Quaker settlement in Snow Camp. From this Day Forward traced the life of the Walden family, whose descendants and bakeries still exist in Valdese.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p18-21
Record #:
35699
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Mountains tours covered a host of interests. History buffs may step back into their favorite time periods in places such as the Farmers Curb Market and Biltmore Homespun Shop. For nature aficionados, there are the Pisgah National Forest and waterfalls. For creative fiction lovers, there were Connemara, Carl Sandburg’s mountain home, and the Flat Rock Playhouse.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p25
Record #:
35701
Author(s):
Abstract:
It was touted as a must see in Hendersonville. The Farmers’ Market fulfilled its promise in a plethora of goods representing traditional mountain living. The cornucopia included dried flowers, home-baked cakes, hot pepper flavored jelly, and handmade toys.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p29
Record #:
35700
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mingus Creek Mill offered a step back in time through visitors observing a miller operate its water powered mill, constructed during the early post-Colonial period. A souvenir for the visit included a bag containing two pounds of produce of the millers’ operation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p28
Record #:
35723
Author(s):
Abstract:
For rock enthusiasts, this article contained gems of the information. Examples are mother lode level locations such as Spruce Pine, Franklin, Little Switzerland, a facility to discover more areas of interest (Museum of North Carolina Minerals), and number of minerals that can be found in the Tar Heel State (over three hundred, in comparison to ten that can be found in other states).
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p30-31
Record #:
35727
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether interested in natural world or NC’s rich history, Wise asserted the Piedmont region catered to both. Historic sites highlighted included the Reed Gold Mine, site of the first gold discovery in the US; Chinqua-Penn Plantation, which contained art from around the globe; and Bennett Place, reconstructed Civil War site for General Johnson’s surrender to General Sherman. Nature and science lovers could be sated through Mount Morrow State Park; North Carolina Zoo, first state-owned zoo in the US; and Museum of Life and Natural Science, which contained the greatest treasure trove of outer space memorabilia.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p19, 41
Record #:
35728
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author proved a sojourn in the state capital captured the essence of NC. Those interested in its history could visit folk villages, the Dodd-Hinsdale House, and Oakwood Cemetery. Visitors wanting entertainment could take in concerts, dance, and sports. Tours about town could yield sightings of the Sacred Heart Cathedral, sidewalk cafes, and working farms. For nature lovers, there were boating in the Neuse River and strolling through gardens such as the Rose Garden.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p42-44
Record #:
35732
Author(s):
Abstract:
Megivern proposed that Tom Wright Jr. played a prominent role in making Wilmington a must see for NC’s coast travelers. That was done chiefly by his crowning achievement, Chandler’s Wharf. It bore evidence of the town’s maritime history in watercraft such the Harry W. Adams. For those seeking historic landmarks on land, there were sites such as the oldest building, now housing a nautical library, and an 1883 cooper’s home that became a restaurant.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p64-65
Record #:
35734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stanley suggested there was NC Coastal treasure not buried in the briny depths. Noted treasure troves on land included the newly restored boardwalk and Hampton Mariner’s Museum. There was also waterborne treasure above the waves, such as the tour boat Karen Ann and marine science laboratory where Rachel Carson penned The Sea Around Us.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p75-76, 79
Record #:
35733
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many places to go in NC, proven by the author. Evidence seen in historic towns such as Edenton and Halifax. Examples of historic houses were the House in a Horseshoe and Duke Homestead. Noted historic sites included Connemara and Guildford Courthouse National Military Park. As for outdoor sites of significance, they included Hammocks Beach and Nantahala National Forest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p75-76, 79
Record #:
35726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Human designed crafts of wood and glass could be found in the Parkway Crafts Center, which the author notes began as a home for textile tycoon Moses Cone. As for nature’s craftsmanship, Moose suggested that could be found in the Craftsman Trail nature walk and forest containing trees such as shagbark hickory. For visitors interested in camping, boating, fishing, horseback riding, and carriage riding, she included information about the nearby Price Campground.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p32-33
Record #:
35729
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decoration Arts, located in Winston-Salem, contained rooms and galleries with furniture and decorations from the Colonial to Victorian periods. The author noted each space represented Southern craftsmanship, taste, and culture from such historic eras.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p45
Record #:
35731
Author(s):
Abstract:
Upton revealed that distant history could be touched, literally and figuratively, in Aurora’s Fossil Museum. Visitors could get up close and personal with eras from eons past in a fossil collection that contained whale vertebrae, sharks’ teeth, and soil from millions of years ago.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p60-61
Record #:
35730
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the author proposed, the coast contained a treasure trove of treats to sate the interest palate of any visitor. History buffs could have their fill in towns such as New Bern, Memorials such as Kittyhawk and houses such as Tryon Palace. For lovers of the great outdoors, there were the Elizabethan Gardens, Jockey’s Ridge, and Merchants Millpond State Park.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p57