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9 results for Manteo
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Record #:
25056
Author(s):
Abstract:
A group of students from UNC Chapel Hill took internships at the Albemarle Ecological Field Site in Manteo. Students learned a lot about various fields and got hands-on participation that helped them better understand what they were learning.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2003, p21-22, por Periodical Website
Record #:
30537
Author(s):
Abstract:
H. G. Jones recounts the efforts of various individuals and organizations over the years to commemorate the anniversaries of the Roanoke Colony founding. Directing the committee planning the quadricentennial to be held in 1984, Jones left in 1974 to work on James B. Hunt’s campaign for governor. His goal was to have jurisdiction of the Roanoke Fort Raleigh site returned to a commission rather than the political appointees of the previous administration.
Source:
Carolina Comments (NoCar F 251 C38), Vol. 33 Issue 5, Sep 1985, p142-150, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35776
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winemaking, starting during the 16th century, had become an important state and national industry by the 19th. Winemakers that contributed to its state and national prominence included Paul Garrett. In fact, by the early twentieth century, his five wineries were producing the best-selling brand in the America, “Virginia Dare.” As for modern day winemakers Stanley believed spurred this tradition’s comeback, they included Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p26-28
Record #:
35878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Roanoke was getting ready for its quadricentennial celebration. Part of the preparation: building a replica of the ship that brought the colonists ashore and Lost Colony Center near Waterside Theatre. As for the celebration, flora and fauna paintings of disappeared colonist John White was being remembered as much as the disappearance itself.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p40-41
Record #:
35730
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the author proposed, the coast contained a treasure trove of treats to sate the interest palate of any visitor. History buffs could have their fill in towns such as New Bern, Memorials such as Kittyhawk and houses such as Tryon Palace. For lovers of the great outdoors, there were the Elizabethan Gardens, Jockey’s Ridge, and Merchants Millpond State Park.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p57
Record #:
36010
Author(s):
Abstract:
Called the gateway to Hatteras Island, the bridge built in the 1960s and named after Senator Herbert Bonner was experiencing the wear and tear of commuting use. Limitations on its daily use were imposed during its repair period. Such an occasion made Island residents all the more aware of the bridge’s importance in their way of life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p46-47
Record #:
36014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of personal interest to the author were also items of historical interest. Up close and personal was the view that he offered of sunken ships, as well as the marine life that lived around them. As visual illustration was a map locating the wrecked watercrafts, which included a German submarine. Accompanying the map was a brief description of each: an old boiler, LST#741, Richmond, Kyzickes, Zane Gray, U-85, and York.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p10-13, map
Record #:
38241
Author(s):
Abstract:
Attracting the attentions of Northern transplants and North Carolina natives in equally copious measures is Dare County’s Manteo. Among its noted virtues of the coastal town are a thriving commercial fishing community, preservation of the town’s connection with the lost colony, and maritime heritage measured in its shipyards’ construction of Naval craft during WWII.
Record #:
38258
Author(s):
Abstract:
Described by the author and displayed in photographs by Patrick Schneider is a Waterside Theatre performance of Paul Green’s The Lost Colony. Words and pictures collaboratively explain the enduring mystique of his play and the Roanoke Island colonists’ story.
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