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177 results for Sea Chest
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Record #:
7524
Author(s):
Abstract:
Construction of the first Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was authorized by Congress in 1794. Price recounts the history of the lighthouse from its construction in 1803 until it was demolished in 1867 in order to build a taller one. A number of problems connected with the structure are listed. The main problem was finding a builder for the job. Later problems included illnesses of the contractor and his crew, poor oil quality, and erosion of the lighthouse base.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p2-5, il
Record #:
7533
Abstract:
In the 1920s, Midgett's father, James O. Casey, was assigned as lighthouse keeper at the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. She recounts her experiences during the several years she and her family lived there.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p49-52, il
Record #:
7534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steve Roberts was born on Portsmouth Island on October 1, 1901, and lived there until 1912, when his family moved to Morehead City. In this SEA CHEST interview, Roberts reminisces about his life on the island, including entertainment, home remedies, ponies, and the great freeze.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p22-27, por
Record #:
7541
Abstract:
Maurice Bernard Folb first came to Hatteras Island in 1920. He was a Chief Pharmacist's Mate with the U.S. Navy and was stationed at Cape Hatteras for six years and ten months. Folb gave medical attention to all who needed it, delivering babies and treating various diseases. In this SEA CHEST interview, he discusses traveling about the island to treat patients, the wreck of the Carroll A. Deering, the diphtheria epidemic, and recreation on the island.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p43-51, il
Record #:
7543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. THE SEA CHEST staff compiled entries from 1874 and 1875 to give the reader a feel for what life at a weather station was like.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p20-30, il
Record #:
7542
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clifford Wade was born on Hatteras Island on November 14, 1882 and at present is the island's oldest resident. At the age of twelve he went to work pound net fishing and later worked in the Lightship Service. Wade describes his experiences in the Great August Storm of 1899 and watching General Billy Mitchell sink two battleships with air power off Hatteras Island in 1923.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p55
Record #:
7546
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SEA CHEST interviewed people who had lived in Dare County all their lives to see what they remembered about some of the severe storms that struck the area. O'Neal interviewed Mrs. Ruth Austin of Hatteras. Mrs. Austin, aged sixty-two, describes storms she remembers, starting in 1933.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p18-23, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7547
Abstract:
Staff members of SEA CHEST interview Hatteras native Harmon Willis about his twenty-year search for the Monitor. The Civil War Ironclad Monitor sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras on December 31, 1862. Willis discusses his trips to suspected sites for the Monitor and other individuals who searched for the lost ironclad.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p24-28, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7545
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Dillon, Dare County commissioner, discusses the county's problems with ocean erosion and why he feels the National Park Service could do more to alleviate the problem.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p5-17, il
Record #:
7552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. THE SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries. This issue covers the year 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p64-70, il
Record #:
7548
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the entries started in the Spring/Summer issue. This issue's compilation covers 1875 to 1879.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p49-60, il
Record #:
7549
Abstract:
In this SEA CHEST interview, Dr. William L. Garlick discusses growing orchids on Hatteras Island. Garlick, a general surgeon and professor of chest surgery at the University of Maryland, has been coming to Hatteras since 1936. He helped found the Maryland Orchid Society twenty-five years ago, and when he retired to Hatteras Island, he built a greenhouse and continued his work.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p15-20, il, por
Record #:
7551
Author(s):
Abstract:
Truex, a history teacher who resides in Ohio, writes of the duck decoys he found on a trip to the Outer Banks. He discovered Outer Banks' decoys have a lack of refinement in design and are more crudely made than those of other areas. Materials used were mostly regional such as canvas over a wire frame, and discarded sections of power line poles, spars from wrecked ships, and fence posts.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p60-61, il
Record #:
7556
Author(s):
Abstract:
The oldest grocery store on Hatteras Island was started in 1866 by C. B. Stowe and A. J. Stowe. The business has remained in the same family and has been in three or four buildings. An old ledger book describes how the business was run, costs of items and what people purchased, and debtor boat accounts, which were items purchased for use with boats.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p16-20, il
Record #:
7550
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jennette interviewed his grandmothers, Mrs. Brittie Burrus and Mrs. Annie Stowe, for information on what life on Hatteras Island was like in the early days of the 20th-century. Without stores to depend on, islanders raised their own fruits, vegetables, and meat. Everyone made their quilts and clothes, and mail was delivered by boat.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p29-31, il