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79 results for Outer Banks--History
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Record #:
3813
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An unlikely pairing on Hatteras Island in 1923 of an illiterate, self-taught midwife, Bathsheba Foster (\"Mis' Bashi\") and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine graduate Blanche Nettleton Epler provides a picture of maternity care and the dangers women faced in childbirth a hundred years ago.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , High Season 1998, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4137
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The Outer Banks Pea Island Lifesaving Station was the nation's only station manned by African Americans. Operating from the late 19th-century until 1947, when machines made rowboats obsolete, the surfmen aided over 30 distressed ships and saved over 200 people. Their most famous rescue was saving the crew of the hurricane-ravaged schooner E.S. NEWMAN on October 11, 1896.
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4436
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In the early days of World War II, residents of the Outer Banks' communities, including Harkers Island and villagers on Hatteras and Ocracoke islands, saw the war up close and personal, as German submarines sank Allied ships within sight of the mainland. Cheatham recounts incidents from the dark days of 1942, when German U-Boats ruled the seas off North Carolina.
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Record #:
4452
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Chicamacomico was one of the most famous lifesaving stations on the Outer Banks. Restored, the building opened as a museum in 1982. Now a second building on the property, built in 1874, is under restoration. Mosher chronicles the restoration, which is being done true to the original style of construction.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p12-17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4563
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With tourism increasing on the Outer Banks, developers began hotel construction. The Nags Header Hotel, a three-story oceanfront structure built at Milepost 11 for $20,000, opened in May 1935. It was billed as the Carolina coast's finest hotel. Amenities included a bath in every room with hot and cold running water. The hotel burned to the ground October 28, 1978. The author's grandfather, George C. Culpepper, Sr., owned the hotel from 1944 to 1970.
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Record #:
4772
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Thousands of ships have met disaster off North Carolina's Outer Banks. The authors describe the fate of three lost in the 19th-century: the HURON, METROPOLIS, and the CRISSIE WRIGHT.
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Record #:
4863
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For three years prior to their historic flight in December 1903, the Wright Brothers battled the elements on the Outer Banks, enduring strong winds, rains, storms, lightning, and the \"bloody beasts\" - mosquitoes. Excerpts from letters home prove the Wright Brothers had the right stuff to persevere.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 7, Dec 2000, p84-90, 92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4961
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For those on the Outer Banks and Carteret County, conflict with the British Navy was continual between 1776 and 1782. Yocum describes the six-year struggle and the patriots who defended coastal Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 10, Mar 2001, p55-57, 59-61, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5039
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Cudworth Cemetery near Wanchese on Roanoke Island marks the final resting place of nineteen homeless men who, during the Great Depression, were among hundreds employed on the Outer Banks's beach erosion control work from 1936 to 1941. Before World War II brought an end to the project, almost 200 miles of barrier dunes had been constructed. Senter recounts their story.
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Record #:
5395
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On December 21, 1884, lookouts at Outer Banks life-saving stations spotted the barkentine EPHRAIM WILLIAMS in distress. Duffus describes the daring rescue of the ship's crew, carried out by Outer Banks lifesavers in huge rolling waves, frigid water, and fierce winds.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 7, Dec 2002, p25-26, 28-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5740
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On March 7, 1962, a powerful nor'easter of huge proportions struck the Outer Banks on Ash Wednesday. Shelton-Roberts describes the fury of the storm, its origins, and aftermath.
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Record #:
5749
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Parramore discusses the Wright Brothers' work leading up to the historic flight on December 17, 1903, and the contributions in work and support of the Outer Bankers and men of the life-saving station.
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Record #:
7477
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In this excerpt from his book, Hatteras Blues: A Story from the Edge of America, Tom Carlson describes how Ernal Foster's ideas about blue-water sportfishing caught on and created an industry on the Outer Banks.
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Record #:
8422
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The author recalls family trips to visit his grandparents in Buxton. Goodwin's grandfather, James Oliver Casey, was a keeper of the lighthouse. Among his responsibilities was maintaining the light, which included carrying five gallons of kerosene to the top of the lighthouse each day. Goodwin remembers catching ferries across the inlet and driving across sand to Buxton. There were no roads at that time, and drivers were careful to avoid quicksand. If travelers were in trouble, the Coast Guard offered quick assistance. At his grandparent's home, Goodwin enjoyed large family meals that usually included seafood, such as fresh-caught fish, crabs, oysters, and scallops. The Outer Banks have changed since Goodwin's childhood. During the Great Depression, for instance, the Civilian Conservation Corps built dunes along the island and planted trees to stabilize the island's continuously shifting sands.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 12, May 1985, p19-21, il, por
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Record #:
8940
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At age 102, Wayland Baum is thought to be the oldest living former employee of the U.S. Lighthouse Service. His father, Thomas Hardy Baum, was an assistant lighthouse keeper at stations on the Outer Banks. Wayland was born August 16, 1904. Baum recounts his days as a substitute lighthouse keeper and time spent on a boat that delivered supplies to the lighthouses. He later had a career in commercial and charter boat fishing and guiding waterfowl hunters. Baum retired at 85 and maintains his own home, washing the windows and painting the house when it needs it.
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