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19 results for Wine and wine making
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Record #:
2453
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The state has had a long history of wine making, from settlers in the early 1700s in New Bern to present-day Biltmore Estate. Beginning with the nation's first commercial winery in Brinkleyville in 1835, the state now has five, with a sixth in progress.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 2, July 1987, p16-18,35, il, por
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Record #:
4472
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The state has a long history of winemaking and at one time was the nation's leader. Now with a Grape Council promoting the wine industry, the state seeks to make a name again as a wine producer. There are fourteen wineries in the state, but three - Biltmore Winery at Asheville, Westbend Vineyards in Lewisville, and Duplin Cellars in Rose Hill - produce 95 percent of the state's wine. Production doubled in the state during the 1990s, rising from 28,954 cases in 1988 to 66,426 cases n 1999.
Record #:
5144
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North Carolina has a long history of wine making, dating back to Sir Walter Raleigh and his Roanoke Colony. Today there are 250 vineyards and 21 wineries in the state, with more in the planning stages. In 2000, over 500,000 gallons of wine were produced. North Carolina ranks tenth in the nation in wine production and twelfth in grape production. Annual retail sales of wine is $25 million.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 8, Aug 2001, p64-71, il
Record #:
6416
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North Carolina is home to over two dozen wineries, ranging from multi-million dollar operations to small mom-and-pop ones. Chase takes the reader on a tour of several, including RagApple Lassie Vineyards (Boonville); Westbend Vineyards (Lewisville); Windy Gap Vineyards (Ronda); and Chateau Laurinda (Sparta).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p76-78,80-81, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7769
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Jackson traces the early days of winemaking in North Carolina. Much of it can be traced back to what is called the Mother Vine, a strong grapevine that has survived four hundred years on Roanoke Island. Three scenarios are put forth for its beginning: the Indians cultivated it; it grew wild; or it was cultivated by the colonists of the Lost Colony. The vine is a scuppernong, a variety of muscadine grape. The vine was once over a half acre in size, but over the years decay, weather, insects, and diseases have reduced its size to about thirty feet wide and one hundred feet long. Life still exists in the vine, and the Duplin Winery was started with cuttings from the Mother Vine.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p82-84, 86, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7794
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Seldon profiles Silver Coast Winery, located at Ocean Isle Beach and owned by Southport orthopedic surgeon Dr. “Bud” Azzato and his wife Maryann Charlap Azzato.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p156-158, 160, 162, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7812
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Currently there are fifty-three wineries in the state, with ten more expected in 2006, and another twenty in 2007. State winemakers face a formidable array of challenges: Pierce's Disease, grape root borers, Ph factors, Supreme Court rulings, the weather, budgeting, and marketing. Still, 600,000 gallons of wine, valued at $34 million, were produced and sold in 2004, making the state the twelfth largest wine producer in the country. Vineyards and wineries create around 835 jobs and have an economic impact of $79 million.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p14, 17,-19, 21-22, 24, 26, il
Record #:
10231
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North Carolina's wine industry pumps a billion dollars into the state's economy. Williams discusses challenges facing the industry.
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Record #:
10665
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Lemuel Sawyer, an early 19th-century congressman, wrote this article concerning wine production in North Carolina in the 1840s. Sawyer notes that white grapes, such as the scuppernong, grow well in the sandy soils of Currituck County, Roanoke Island, and the Albemarle Sound regions. While most homes in this area had vines and produced wine in a \"rude\" way, with little filtration, no time for fermentation and the product being mixed with five gallons of apple brandy per barrel of wine, the results were, according to Sawyer, little more than preserved grape juice. Sawyer recounts his own experiment in which he attempted to produce a high quality wine and champagne from the scuppernong grape, the results of which he called \"fully equal to the celebrated product of France.\" He also notes that, given the wide availability of scuppernong grapes in the region, wine production in the area could be more profitable than farming or grazing.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 1, June 1969, p18-19
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Record #:
11679
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Winemaking is making a comeback in North Carolina. Medoc Vineyard, founded in 1835 in Halifax County, was the state's first winery. Duplin Wine Cellars, located in Rose Hill, is one of the state's newest wineries.
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Record #:
12039
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There are over eighty wineries in North Carolina, and in 2009 the Haw River Valley, covering 868-square-miles, became the state's third American Viticultural Area. This federal recognition is for the potential of an area to produce distinctive wines. Max Lloyd of Grove Winery discusses winemaking.
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Record #:
20807
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The Banner Elk Winery, which opened in 2006, has, at 4,800 feet, the highest vineyard in the Eastern United States. The winery is co-owned by Richard Wolfe, Angelo Accetturo and Pete and Michelle Gerukos. Wolfe, who directs the Applied Science and Research Program at Appalachian State University, received a grant to start a vineyard at 4,800 feet. At first people laughed, but there are now thirty-two vineyards growing cold-hardy grapes in Avery and Watauga counties which the winery uses. The winery has been awarded a number of medals in competitions, such as the 2013 International Eastern Wine Competition in Sonoma County, California.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p168-170, 172, 174, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23080
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The variation in climates throughout North Carolina produces a diverse assortment of wines in the state. This article offers a brief description of the many types of wine and provides a map with the locations of North Carolina wineries.
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Record #:
24206
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Duplin Winery is a family operated business in Duplin County. The author discusses the history of how it became the biggest winery in the Southeast.
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Record #:
28019
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The history of North Carolina winemaking and the popularity and success of the Tokay Vineyard in Fayetteville are detailed. In the late 19th century, some of the best wines on the East Coast came from former Confederate Col. W.J. Green’s Tokay Vineyard in Fayetteville. North Carolina has long been considered a place where great wine can be produced.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 37, September 2010, p37 Periodical Website
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