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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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71 results for Wright, Renee
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Record #:
7059
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Abstract:
Across the state, historic movie theaters are being saved, refurbished, and reborn. Old theaters are a hot ticket in many downtown areas. Wright discusses some of them, including a number of theaters that bore the name Carolina Theatre.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 2, Feb 2005, p60, il
Record #:
7128
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Wright discusses the resurgence of railroad travel in North Carolina and the interest of many towns in restoring the old train stations either as functioning rail stations or for use in other capacities. Many of the stations already rescued and renovated include Greensboro's 1924 station and others in Selma, High Point, Wilson, and Hamlet. Rocky Mount's 1893 station is the oldest one still in use in North Carolina.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 3, Mar 2005, p60-61, il
Record #:
7170
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By boat is the best way for some vacationers to travel from the Great Dismal Swamp down to Old Baldy Lighthouse off Southport. Each a year about 2,000 snowbirds (people who travel south in the winter and north in the summer) sail that route. Many others enjoy fishing, birdwatching, cruising, kayaking, and sightseeing in the well-maintained waters of eastern North Carolina. Wright describes sights to see along the waterways and a short distance inland.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Apr 2005, p46-47, il
Record #:
7202
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Tourism is North Carolina's second largest industry. In 2004, forty-nine million people visited the state and spent $13.2 billion. To attract the 87 percent of tourists who travel to the state by car, truck, or RV, regional agencies, together with local and state agencies, have developed themed driving trails that crisscross the state. Trails deal with natural resources, historic sites, arts and crafts, music, food, wine, gardens, and motorsports. The driving trails take travelers to more than seventy destinations, some far off the usual tourist destinations, like Rose Hill and Bear Creek.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p46, 49-51, 54-55, il
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Record #:
7203
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Abstract:
When George Washington Vanderbilt built Biltmore House in the 1890s, he was constructing more than just a large house. He envisioned his 125,000-acre estate as being self-sufficient, growing its own food, weaving its own cloth, and raising its own meat. Wright discusses how this philosophy carries on into the twenty-first century. One million people visit Biltmore annually and spend around $183.4 million. The estate employs 1,500 people, and its economic impact on western North Carolina is about $351 million annually.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p48, il
Record #:
7204
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Zoological Park, the country's first state-supported zoo, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2004. It is recognized as one of the top zoos in the nation. The zoo was designed as a natural habitat environment zoo without bars. There are over 1,100 animals representing 204 species living there. Wright describes how the zoo has developed and grown over the past thirty years.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p52-53, il
Record #:
7205
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Abstract:
Wright describes the Civil War Trails program, a three-state, federally funded program that seeks to increase recognition of Civil War history at sites in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. In North Carolina the new driving trails recall the state's pivotal role in the Civil War. Over one hundred markers are included in North Carolina's first section of the trail, most of them placed for the very first time. Red, white, and blue signs sporting bugles direct visitors to the sites. Bentonville, Fort Fisher, forts on the Outer Banks, and Plymouth are included in stage one. Second stage markers will focus on the war's action in the western part of the state.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p56-57, il
Record #:
7239
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No theme parks, just genuine Americana, is what visitors to Johnston County discover. Smithfield, the county's oldest town and county seat, boasts the Johnston County Heritage Center, an historic district, a new riverwalk along the Neuse River, and the Ava Gardner Museum. Other attractions are the town of Selma, with its restored 1924 Union Depot; Kenly, with its internationally recognized Farm Life Museum; and the Bentonville Civil War battlefield. With the county's rural heritage, agritourism is a natural. Atkinson's Mill, one of the state's last water-powered grist mills, and farms offering tours, petting zoos, and seasonal pick-your-own crops attract tourists.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p28-29, il
Record #:
7237
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Reynolda House, built between 1906 and 1917 in Winston-Salem, was the home of tobacco baron Richard Reynolds and his wife Katherine. It opened to the public in 1967 as a museum, one of the first in the country to specialize in American art. The museum has opened a $12 million, three-story addition, the Mary and Charles Babcock Wing, named for the daughter and son-in-law of the Reynolds's. The 30,000-square-foot addition includes galleries, an expanded museum store, and an auditorium.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p10, il
Record #:
7242
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Abstract:
Outdoor drama as a theatrical genre was born in 1937 in the Tar Heel state when collaboration between the town of Manteo and North Carolina playwright Paul Green resulted in \"The Lost Colony\" production. This play is now the nation's oldest outdoor drama, followed by Cherokee's “Unto These Hills” and Boone's “Horn in the West” in second and third place. In the summer of 2005, nine historical drams will be in production across the state, more than any other state in the country.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p52-53, il
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Record #:
7272
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Business travel, especially trips to association meetings and corporate meetings, has returned to its pre-2001 levels. Competition among convention, conference centers, and halls to make their facilities attractive to travelers is highly competitive. Across the state, planners of meetings pull out all the stops to make business meetings both successful and fun, from high tech connections to team building games, to golf, waterfalls, and spas.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 7, July 2005, p12, 14-15, 17-22, il
Record #:
7273
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Abstract:
Many of North Carolina's centers for association and business meetings feature spas. These spas are built with groups in mind -- huge facilities that can accommodate large numbers of conference participants. Wright describes some of the best-known ones, including the Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa and the Rock Barn Golf Club and Spa in Conover.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 7, July 2005, p16, il
Record #:
7275
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The music of the Southern Appalachians, called old-time music, is a unique style of traditional playing that is based on the banjo and the fiddle, along with other stringed instruments, such as the guitar, dulcimer, and dobro. From spring to late fall, this style of music is performed all over the state at festivals and at other venues, such as restaurants. Wright lists a number of places where lovers of this music can hear it performed.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 7, July 2005, p43-44, il
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Record #:
7384
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Wright discusses the art museums located on the state's college and university campuses. In October 2005, Duke University will unveil its new Nasher Museum of Art. At UNC-Chapel Hill, the Ackland Art Museum has doubled its exhibition space. Wake Forest University has an extensive collection of American art, and North Carolina A&T has large collections of African and African American art. The museums are usually free or charge a small admission.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p25-26, il
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Record #:
7382
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Abstract:
Scenic byways take travelers off the fast paced interstate roads and onto less congested, unhurried ones. The byways give travelers an opportunity to explore every corner of North Carolina. Wright describes some byways found in the mountain, piedmont, and coastal areas.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p14-19, il
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