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28 results for Wineries
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Record #:
2453
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The state has had a long history of wine making, from settlers in the early 1700s in New Bern to present-day Biltmore Estate. Beginning with the nation's first commercial winery in Brinkleyville in 1835, the state now has five, with a sixth in progress.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 2, July 1987, p16-18,35, il, por
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Record #:
3408
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Wineries thrived in the state prior to the Civil War, and until just before Prohibition, the state was the country's leading wine maker. Currently, eleven wineries are in production.
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Record #:
4472
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The state has a long history of winemaking and at one time was the nation's leader. Now with a Grape Council promoting the wine industry, the state seeks to make a name again as a wine producer. There are fourteen wineries in the state, but three - Biltmore Winery at Asheville, Westbend Vineyards in Lewisville, and Duplin Cellars in Rose Hill - produce 95 percent of the state's wine. Production doubled in the state during the 1990s, rising from 28,954 cases in 1988 to 66,426 cases n 1999.
Record #:
5144
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North Carolina has a long history of wine making, dating back to Sir Walter Raleigh and his Roanoke Colony. Today there are 250 vineyards and 21 wineries in the state, with more in the planning stages. In 2000, over 500,000 gallons of wine were produced. North Carolina ranks tenth in the nation in wine production and twelfth in grape production. Annual retail sales of wine is $25 million.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 8, Aug 2001, p64-71, il
Record #:
6416
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North Carolina is home to over two dozen wineries, ranging from multi-million dollar operations to small mom-and-pop ones. Chase takes the reader on a tour of several, including RagApple Lassie Vineyards (Boonville); Westbend Vineyards (Lewisville); Windy Gap Vineyards (Ronda); and Chateau Laurinda (Sparta).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p76-78,80-81, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7309
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Wineries thrived in the state prior to the Civil War, and until just before Prohibition, the state was the country's leading wine maker. Now winemaking is making a comeback in North Carolina. In the last six years, wineries increased from 18 to 42; vineyards doubled from 175 to 350; the value of wine grapes increased from $2.2 million to $3.3 million annually; and two community colleges are offering programs in viticulture.
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Record #:
7812
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Currently there are fifty-three wineries in the state, with ten more expected in 2006, and another twenty in 2007. State winemakers face a formidable array of challenges: Pierce's Disease, grape root borers, Ph factors, Supreme Court rulings, the weather, budgeting, and marketing. Still, 600,000 gallons of wine, valued at $34 million, were produced and sold in 2004, making the state the twelfth largest wine producer in the country. Vineyards and wineries create around 835 jobs and have an economic impact of $79 million.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p14, 17,-19, 21-22, 24, 26, il
Record #:
8019
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Wineries are growing in North Carolina. In 2001, fifteen or so were producing wines. By 2006, the number of wineries had grown to fifty-three. They range from the grandeur of Biltmore Estate to cottage operations like Hanover Park. A number of wineries like Shelton, RayLen, Childress, and Westbend, have put the state on the national wine scene with award-winning wines.
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Record #:
9391
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The scuppernong has been the favored for winemaking in the south since 1584 when a Roanoke colonists recorded the grapes' abundance. The grape is now going commercial from Chowan County, at Wine Cellars, Inc., North Carolina's only winery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p17, il
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Record #:
9392
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Sold under the brand name “Deerfield Vineyards,” Edenton's Wine Cellars, Inc. once had the distinction of being North Carolina's only legal winery. The 83-acre vineyard grows the sweet scuppernong grapes that yield a light, dry table wine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p17-18, il
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Record #:
9412
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Williams explores the wine country of the northern crescent of the Yadkin River Valley, which stretches through the counties of Surry, Wilkes, and Yadkin. He describes a number of wineries and accommodations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 4, Sept 2007, p200-202, 204, 206-207, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10231
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North Carolina's wine industry pumps a billion dollars into the state's economy. Williams discusses challenges facing the industry.
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Record #:
10495
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One of North Carolina's newest niche economies is its growing wine industry. From Moonrise Bay Vineyard at the northern tip of the Outer Banks to Asheville's Biltmore Estate, North Carolina has 400 vineyards and around 72 wineries in 30 counties. The industry employs a workforce of over 5,700 with a payroll of about $159 million.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 32, Aug 2008, p17-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16563
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Ensrud recommends a series of excellent North Carolina-made wines as well as road trip-worthy wineries in the State.
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Record #:
16715
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North Carolinians can be proud of the rapid progress of the fledgling wine industry of the state. The groundwork was laid some 30 years ago and has overcome major challenges with producing quality wines.
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