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22 results for Green, Paul Eliot, 1894-1981
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Record #:
1500
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After relating the theatrical and literary achievements of Green's life, Roper describes Green's military service in World War I and his \"war songs,\" poems he wrote about his experiences.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring 1994, p22-46, il, por, bibl, f Periodical Website
Record #:
1501
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Paul Green's numerous talents and interests make efforts to label him difficult. One of his pursuits was documentation of the language and folklore of his native North Carolina, particularly the Cape Fear Valley.
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Record #:
2049
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March 17, 1994, marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of North Carolina's greatest playwright, Paul Green. Born on a farm in Harnett County, Green wrote such dramas as THE LOST COLONY and the Pulitzer Prize-winning IN ABRAHAM'S BOSOM.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 10, Mar 1994, p16-19, por
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Record #:
5890
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Paul Green, born on a farm in Harnett County on March 17, 1894, grew up to write such dramas as THE LOST COLONY and the 1927 Pulitzer Prize-winning IN ABRAHAM'S BOSOM. Green is profiled in this Leggett article.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Feb 2003, p43-45, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6027
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Modern outdoor drama began in Manteo with the first performance of The Lost Colony. In this NEW EAST interview playwright Paul Green reminisces about his most famous creation.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p18-21, por
Record #:
7107
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Paul Green was a student at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill when the United States entered World War I in 1917. He put his studies aside and enlisted in the army. From the first day of his enlistment, he kept a diary of his experiences in this country and on the battlefields in Belgium. Using selections from Green's diary, Spence interspersed details from a conversation he had with the author in 1974, to create a picture of one soldier's life during World War I.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p84-86, 88-89, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7770
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Throughout his life author Paul Green carried note cards in his pocket on which he would jot down words and phrases he remembered from his early years in Harnett County. The cards were filed and later became the basis of Paul Green's WORD BOOK: AN ALPHABET OF REMINISCENCE. From this his daughter Betsy Green Moyer, an expert photographer, has compiled the entries relating to flowers. Together with her co-editor, botanist Ken Moore, she has matched flower photographs with Green's comments. The result of the three-year project is Paul Green's PLANT BOOK: AN ALPHABET OF FLOWERS & FOLKLORE.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p100-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10565
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The North Carolina Award is the highest honor the state can bestow on its citizens. Suggested by Dr. Robert Lee Humber of Greenville and instituted by the 1961 General Assembly, the award recognizes 'notable accomplishments by North Carolina citizens in the fields of scholarship, research, the fine arts, and public leadership.' Frank P. Graham (public service), Paul Green (literature), Gerald W. Johnson (author), Hunter Johnson (fine arts), and Frederick A. Wolf received the award in 1965.
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North Carolina Awards (NoCar Oversize F 253 N67x), Vol. Issue 2, May 1965, punnumbered, por
Record #:
15205
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Paul Green, the noted playwright and author of Chapel, is currently writing for the movies in Hollywood. He discusses the Little Cinema Movement, which is the creation of movies in smaller venues, such as the University of North Carolina, where expenses are less. Harvard University already has such a program. He also gives his impressions about some of the present-day stars.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 22, Oct 1934, p7, por
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Record #:
16003
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Paul Green's career as an author and playwright flourished in the 1930s. During this period, he penned THIS BODY THE EARTH, novel, and was involved with HYMN TO THE RISING SUN, JOHNNY JOHNSON, and THE LOST COLONY. His novel, THIS BODY THE EARTH, focuses on people of the Atlantic coastal plain stretching from the Chesapeake Bay to Florida.
Record #:
16425
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Paul Green, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was born on a farm near Lillington, North Carolina. A graduate of Buie's Creek Academy and the University of North Carolina, Green's 1927 play In Abraham's Bosom won the Pulitzer Prize. He also wrote some twenty-five to thirty movies and numerous other plays.
Record #:
18612
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North Carolina playwright and screenwriter Paul Green contributed to dozens of Hollywood scripts between the early 1930s and 1960, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for his 1927 play, In Abraham's Bosom, and famously wrote the outdoor history play, The Lost Colony, which has run every summer in Manteo since 1937. Green, an advocate for liberal social reforms in the South, used both his plays and film scripts to voice his social concerns.
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Record #:
18959
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North Carolina author and playwright Paul Green experienced a diverse and successful career as a writer, screenwriter, and playwright. Most famous for The Lost Colony, which depicted early colonists in North Carolina, Green was able to parley his success into the support of progressive social causes in the South.
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Record #:
18958
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Interviewer William Howard Rough revisits the 1960 interview he conducted with playwright Paul Green where they discussed the state of the theater, the need for theater for the American public, and Paul Green's The Lost Colony.
Record #:
21112
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Pulitzer prize-winner Paul Green is best known for his nearly 100 plays for stage and screen, most notably The Lost Colony about the lost English colony on Roanoke Island, North Carolina. While not what he is mostly known for, Green was also a documentarian who collected mounds of data on the life history of the people of the Cape Fear Valley and documented language usage as early as World War I. Green's estate posthumously published Paul Green's Wordbook, a two-volume, 1,245 page tome which included decades of his research on the Cape Fear Valley.
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