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37 results for Hatteras Island--Social life and customs
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Record #:
20606
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state has started experimenting with laying asphalt on top of the sands on Hatteras Island. If the experiment at Whalebone withstands high tides and drifting sand, or can be reasonably maintained, then the road will be extended fifty miles down to the village of Hatteras. Sharpe describes the lives of the people on the island who now drive on the sand at certain times and how the coming road might affect them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 26, Nov 1945, p3-5, il
Full Text:
Record #:
35943
Abstract:
The life of Archie Scarborough included a skill for square knot making. Much of the interview pivoted around this talent, what he also called macramé making. Traveling the conversation path included life landmarks such as contenting with the Park Service and helping to construct Wimble Shoals Lighthouse and a railroad in Kitty Hawk.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p48-53
Record #:
36025
Abstract:
Clarence Jennette’s memories recalled were of the area’s well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. The Hatteras residents’ method of battening down the hatches and waiting it out—has proven to help them weather any storm.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p8-9
Record #:
36004
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old time crabbing meant trot lines instead of wire pots, and income of three cents a pound versus the contemporary rate of twelve. From Edward Scarborough’s observations about facts like these, one ironic conclusion could be drawn. A better living could be made in the midst of the Great Depression than forty years later.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p18-21
Record #:
36016
Abstract:
It was a lost art to America in general, perhaps. In Hatteras Island, Mrs. Brittie Burrus proved interest in quilting could be found in girls who were part of the Methodist Church’s Day Circle.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p62-63
Record #:
35934
Author(s):
Abstract:
A continuation of the series begun in Sea Chest’s first edition, this collection of journal entries mostly chronicled the meteorological conditions between September 1874-July 1879. Wedged between daily reports of barometric pressure were occasional ones of ships setting sail and their minor damages. Rare reports were of loss of life from shipwrecks and drownings.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p48-60
Record #:
35946
Abstract:
Times had changed, as indicated in the girls’ age range, 18-28, and a marital status for some. A sign of changed times was also evident in chaperones needed if males visited. Timeless values could be seen in purposes for a club with an overnight stay option: rest, reading, and recreation.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p14-15
Record #:
35945
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Sea Chest staff continued the Weather Station’s briny borne adventures in these entries, chronicled between March-June 1876. Wedged between the ordinary reports of barometric pressure was the extraordinary three week disappearance of Private Hanes. To illustrate the difference between charting the weather during the 19th century and current methods, included were pictures of modern weather forecasting equipment.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p64-70
Record #:
35959
Author(s):
Abstract:
There were many examples of words retaining the original spelling, while having the pronunciation style of the area embedded. Noteworthy included harrycane (hurricane) and Hattress (Hatteras). Words with village values embedded included fryin’ (boiling, in reference to the sea) and meeting house (church).
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p40
Record #:
35972
Author(s):
Abstract:
Detailed primarily were eventful and uneventful cases of labor and delivery this doctor attended during his six years of services. His descriptions included timely obstetric practices, such as use of pituitrin, and life threatening childbirth-related conditions like sepsis. As for his patients, offered also were observations that showed his respect for the people and their culture.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p58-65
Record #:
35971
Author(s):
Abstract:
“A picture is worth a thousand words” comes to life nine-fold in these photos taken in Buxton. The time frame covered ranged from the reign of the model A to the prevalence of cars offering four-wheel drive. Scenic views were of forests, the lighthouse, and local homes. Activities mentioned for then and now noted the enduring value of family reunions and baseball.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p30-33
Record #:
35990
Abstract:
The former Maude Miller had an eventful career history. She was first a schoolteacher at what was called a "pay school" by Hatteras Island residents. She became the county welfare supervisor during the 1930s, gaining experience with the Depression’s effects on the Island. As a postmistress, she was second generation employee (her father served during the 1800s). During World War II, she was a Coastal Observer, with the Navy issuing a service certificate. Of her late husband, Estus Preston White, she noted their common work background in education, with his work on the Board. His local administrative roles included chairman of Methodist Sunday School and electric plant, as well as county administrative work as a commissioner.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p52-59
Record #:
35991
Author(s):
Abstract:
His life didn’t include authorship until he was eighty-three. As if to make up for lost writing time, he has published The Kinnakeeter, and while still engaged in Sunday School teaching, he has started his second book, Isle of Paradise (about Hatteras Island). The careers that occupied his life before writing were teacher, fisherman, wholesale merchant, and co-owner of a seaweed business (he and his father were the first to bring this type of business to Hatteras Island).
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p60-61
Record #:
35998
Abstract:
Among Mrs. Cynthia Rollinson’s recollections of life were the lives she helped delivered as a midwife. As for life from decades ago, she could attest to a time when homes had ice boxes instead of refrigerators. She could also attest to a way Hatteras Island seemed futuristic, even in its dependency on kerosene as a light source: it had windmills.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p42-43
Record #:
35993
Author(s):
Abstract:
On paper, particularly newspaper, what Captain Bernice Balance might be best known for was his bravery. This characteristic was chiefly expressed during his career in the Life Saving Service, now called the Coast Guard. The life-saving incident that made the papers was his role in the rescue of Coast guardsmen adrift after a hurricane struck the North Carolina coast in September 1944. Incidents perhaps just as worthy of print included his catch of a seventy five pound channel bass, touted as the "world's record for drum caught in the surf."
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p88-90