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25 results for Teachers
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Record #:
4353
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The state is below the national average in the percentage of male teachers in the classroom, being 19 percent compared to the national 27 percent. Only 14,611 of the state's 76,815 teachers are male. Among factors contributing to this are the low pay compared to other professions and the old bias of \"you're not manly if you're a teacher - unless you're the coach.\"
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Record #:
4728
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The United States Coast Guard Station on Ocracoke Island closed in 1996 after nearly six decades of service. Now, through a $400,000 appropriation from the North Carolina General Assembly, the 10,000-square-foot building will be renovated for use as a professional development center for North Carolina teachers. The North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teachers (NCCAT) at Cullowhee and the East Carolina University maritime studies program will manage the building.
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Record #:
4739
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Jeanne Laws (Elkin City High School), Amy Orr Hobbs (Robbinsville High School), Vickie Honeycutt (Mt. Pleasant High School, Cabarrus County), and Judy Lewis (Grantham School) are Regional Teachers of the Year for 2000-2001. Among items the winners receive are a $5,000 stipend, software and computer training, and a one-week seminar at the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching at Cullowhee.
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Record #:
4738
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Joyce Elliott has been elected president of the North Carolina Association of Educators, and Carolyn McKinney, vice president. They will serve a one-year term from July 1, 2000 through June 30, 2001.
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Record #:
9297
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Daintry Allison became a schoolteacher in Beech Log, North Carolina in 1914. This article is an account of her eventful first year based on a taped interview the author conducted with her in Fairview on July 24, 1975.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p16-18, 37, il
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Record #:
16145
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Educators, parents, and students usually define curriculum as the courses the school offers and students earn credit for taking. Local school boards control the curriculum in North Carolina as long as they follow the guidelines of the State Board of Education. Teachers deliver the curriculum, but courts have established in North Carolina that they do not have the authority under the First Amendment to make changes in it, challenge or fail to follow the school board's curriculum decisions. The authors discuss the lack of First Amendment protection for teachers' curricular speech and the options schools boards have as a result of that lack of protection.
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School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. Issue 1, July 2009, p1-14, f
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Record #:
19399
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Governor Pat McCrory's 2013 budget includes hiring 1,800 new teachers. McCrory supporters believe this is a progressive step in education reform. Skeptics claim 1,800 new teachers is an appeasement and only begin to make-up for the 4,300 teaching positions lost before and during the recession.
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Record #:
31093
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The North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program, the first in the nation, has awarded nearly 6,800 full college scholarships. The state awards high school graduates a full, four-year college scholarship in exchange for their return to teach in the state’s schools after they finish college. Alumni describe their experiences in the program and how it prepared them for the classroom.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 6, June 2004, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31240
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Laura Bilbro-Berry is a second-grade teacher at John C. Tayloe Elementary in Washington, and North Carolina’s 2000 Teacher of the Year. Bilbro-Berry has also received three Bright Ideas grants from Tideland Electric Membership Corporation. The grants helped to support Bilbro-Berry’s projects, which aimed to relate mathematics to everyday life, teach students about responsibility, and create an aquarium-based ecosphere.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 8, Aug 2000, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35328
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For educator Jacob Brooks, defining the year as nerve-wracking was easy, as easy as it was defining the last twelve months as “quite a year.” The challenge was in deciding which of the two events discussed—one personal, the other professional—was more so.
Record #:
35642
Author(s):
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The passage of years wasn’t enough to dim the recollection of a sixth grade teacher like Miss Elva and classmate like Jeffro Tillerson. Though they were gone in a sense by the time of Beauchamp’s writing, they were still alive in memory, and worthy of written recollection.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p14-16
Record #:
35990
Abstract:
The former Maude Miller had an eventful career history. She was first a schoolteacher at what was called a "pay school" by Hatteras Island residents. She became the county welfare supervisor during the 1930s, gaining experience with the Depression’s effects on the Island. As a postmistress, she was second generation employee (her father served during the 1800s). During World War II, she was a Coastal Observer, with the Navy issuing a service certificate. Of her late husband, Estus Preston White, she noted their common work background in education, with his work on the Board. His local administrative roles included chairman of Methodist Sunday School and electric plant, as well as county administrative work as a commissioner.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p52-59
Record #:
35992
Abstract:
A true down homer was about more than just being born in a local town or having one’s name affiliated with a local building. What made Charlie Gray Sr. so included turning down job offers after graduation from North Carolina State College, so he could own a local grocery store. Being a down homer was also reflected in his promotion of education for the area. During his almost fifty year career as a school principal and teacher, he professed a hope for Hatteras Island to have a central accredited high school.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p72-77
Record #:
36005
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Abstract:
The school system as she knew it back then: one room buildings, students of all ages taught together, and a salary of thirty five dollars a month. It may be surprising, then, for her to conclude those conditions better. A common explanation may be a salary almost a tenth of a contemporary salary stretching further. A less common conclusion may echo Leona Meekins’: God’s providence provided a fortunate and richly lived life.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p22-25
Record #:
36011
Author(s):
Abstract:
The resident named for her father’s mule or a family member held values characteristic of Hatteras Island life, such as deep religious beliefs. Activities betraying the time in which she grew up included her mother sewing clothes for a family of twelve. Ways she made a personal mark on her world included opening her home to tourists and village newcomers alike. From such acts of hospitality, a life commonly lived might also be called an uncommon life.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p48-52