NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for School buildings
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1088
Author(s):
Abstract:
Architects, faced with the problems of population growth, old and deteriorating buildings, changing technology, and funding issues, strive to upgrade NC's educational facilities.
Source:
North Carolina Architecture (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 41 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p10-20, il, por
Record #:
2328
Author(s):
Abstract:
While designing school projects is lucrative for architects, they often must deal with layers of local bureaucracy in completing a project. Elimination of the Department of Public Instruction's Division of School Planning adds to the problem.
Source:
North Carolina Architecture (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 43 Issue 2, Spring 1995, p7-9, il
Record #:
4752
Abstract:
When some school systems have a school construction design that meets their meets, they often reuse it in constructing other buildings. The architect still does design work to make sure the plan meets new guidelines and site conditions. Advantages to reuse include saving design fees and reduced time to complete construction. Williams-Tracy describes how Pender County and Charlotte-Mecklenburg School Systems reuse school construction plans.
Source:
Voice (NoCar LB 2831.624 N8 V6x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2000, p30-31, il
Record #:
28650
Abstract:
The Russell School in Durham is one of the few remaining Rosenwald Schools. 5,000 Rosenwald Schools were built for African Americans in the segregated south by Julius Rosenwald, the former president of Sears, Roebuck & Company. Durham’s Helen Rosenwald recently visited the school in Durham and connected with the alumni who attended the school founded by her cousin, Julius Rosenwald. Helen Rosenwald’s story as a Jewish refugee during World War II, the stories of alumni of the Russell School, and the history of the two groups and the school is detailed.
Source:
Record #:
30892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carrboro High School, the newest school in the Orange County school system, teaches students daily about using energy and natural resources carefully. The design and construction of the school buildings emphasize energy conservation, water reduction, high efficiency lighting, and positive indoor air quality.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p14-15, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
31394
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the first few years of the twentieth-century, a little one-room log schoolhouse stood on top of Eutaw Mountain in Haywood County. Selena Sanders of Roanoke Rapids tells a story describing a typical school day and life growing up in the mountains.
Source:
Record #:
31609
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1847 Setzer School is a restored one-room school house in Salisbury, North Carolina. Each fall, for the past two years, visiting school children experience a re-enactment of a typical school day in the nineteenth century. The experience is historically accurate as possible, demonstrating how life, culture, and educational practices have changed over one-hundred years.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan 1976, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35628
Author(s):
Abstract:
The public education experience for many in decades past was spent in one room schoolhouses. The people of Williamston were reminded of that experience. It came with the arrival of the Poplar Point School, constructed circa Civil War and lately restored to its original condition. With its migration from this small town came reminders of that way of life for students. It was one different in many ways and better in some ways, to the author’s estimation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p34-36
Record #:
36005
Author(s):
Abstract:
The school system as she knew it back then: one room buildings, students of all ages taught together, and a salary of thirty five dollars a month. It may be surprising, then, for her to conclude those conditions better. A common explanation may be a salary almost a tenth of a contemporary salary stretching further. A less common conclusion may echo Leona Meekins’: God’s providence provided a fortunate and richly lived life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p22-25
Record #:
36001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Maggie Austin’s story, people from small towns like Frisco and decades past could relate to. In her youth, common were one-room schoolhouses and schooling stopped at the seventh grade, traveling by boat and on dirt roads. For all the disadvantages focused on by younger generations and city residents, she asserted Hatteras Island to be the best place to live.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p48-49
Record #:
36042
Abstract:
Lincoln Academy, located in Gastonia, NC, was one of the first accredited African American high schools. The school closed in the 1950s and fell into disrepair and became a hub for teenagers. When the body of a teenage girl was found there, rumors and legends started up associated with the murder.