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8 results for Education--History
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Record #:
8353
Abstract:
In 1884, Mrs. Emily C. Prudden, a deaf, middle-aged, and former New England housemother visited the Francis Garretts in Gastonia concerning establishment of a girls' school. Mrs. Prudden continued to travel across western North Carolina establishing one or more schools in various towns. She prearranged benefactors for each school, as well as procured individual and organizational contributions. In 1888, she established Lincoln Academy at All Healing Springs, the first of seven schools she founded for blacks. She never asked for payment or recognition for her efforts, and none of the fifteen schools she built in her thirty-year career bore her name.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984, p10, 11, 23, por
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Record #:
14451
Author(s):
Abstract:
At Cullowhee they do more than teach history out of history books; they revitalize it in manner which has strong appeal to the children studying it by exhibiting artifacts from historic periods.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 33, Jan 1948, p3, 18-19
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Record #:
19585
Author(s):
Abstract:
During this period (1868-1926), the author identifies the progress of the state's public school system through both legislative measures and public interest in improving education. The author attributes the enhanced public school system to several constitutional amendments and rulings by the General Assembly which both increased the school year and funding for public schools.
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Record #:
20253
Abstract:
This is a reprint of a paper presented at the forty-eighth annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December 3, 1948. This paper looks at the importance of the three-day educational convention that met in the First Baptist Church of Raleigh beginning on Tuesday, February 11, 1873.
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Record #:
20809
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article provides an introduction to the history of universal education in North Carolina between 1900 and 1933. Information on the school consolidation movement as well as the contributions of Governor Charles B. Aycock to the development of state education is included.
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Record #:
24470
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Stanley County academy, called Yadkin Mineral Springs Academy, was led by Edgar Freeman Eddins and known for its high standards and the fact that most of its graduates went to college and achieved positions of prominence in North Carolina and elsewhere.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 5, October 1991, p13-14, il
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Record #:
26926
Author(s):
Abstract:
The building that once housed Asheville’s former Plonk School of the Creative Arts was built in 1925 and originally served as the headquarters of the Asheville Women’s Club. In 1941, the building became home to the Plonk School until 1964 when the school closed its doors. The building is now being divided into single family dwellings, but the exterior will still reflect the building’s history.
Record #:
31609
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1847 Setzer School is a restored one-room school house in Salisbury, North Carolina. Each fall, for the past two years, visiting school children experience a re-enactment of a typical school day in the nineteenth century. The experience is historically accurate as possible, demonstrating how life, culture, and educational practices have changed over one-hundred years.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan 1976, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website